AUSTRALIAN PROPLINER DELIVERIES TO SE ASIA - PART 3

Compiled by Geoff Goodall

This final installment details two unrelated events, three years apart, that sent 17 Australian Douglas DC-3s and RAAF C-47s to various South East Asian countries.  These deliveries took place at the same time as the commercial airliner sales listed in Parts 1 & 2:

1968: Seven RAAF Dakotas listed for disposal at Parafield SA were purchased by US aircraft dealer Stan Booker
1971: Australian Government assistance in the disposal of Jetair Australia DC-3s results in the "Australian Aid DC-3 Give-Away"


THE PARAFIELD SEVEN - STANLEY T. BOOKER

          In May 1968 tenders were officially called for the disposal of 7 retired RAAF Dakotas at Parafield Airport, Adelaide SA. However the disposal had been planned for over a year, as the Dakotas were ferried to the military overhaul hangars at Parafield, which were still referred to as the "DAP hangars", from their wartime use by the Departrment of Aircraft Production.
         During 1967 American aircraft salesman Stanley Booker visited Adelaide several times. He had a ferry contract to deliver new Cessna 310s and 402s to the Indonesian Air Force, and after each delivery would look for aircraft sales opportunities in neighbouring countries. He had heard of the pending Dakota disposal at Parafield and visited for talks with disposals officials and inspect the aircraft. While at Parafield he met the local team planning to recover the six atomic test Mustangs at Emu in the SA desert. Stan quickly struck a deal whereby he would finance their purchase and recovery costs, in return for the Adelaide group retaining the best aircraft for themselves.
        He arranged to have his five Mustangs shipped from Parafield to a warbird dealer in New York, and the sixth Mustang A68-1 was also included at the last moment when the Adelaide group signed it over to Booker after the Department of Civil Aviation refused to allow it to be civil registered.   (See EMU ATOMIC MUSTANGS in the Photographs section of this site)
        In June 1968 Booker won the tender process for the 7 Dakotas, under the name CalgAir Sales Inc, Calgary, Canada: the former RAAF A65-60, A65-70, A65-85, A65-101, A65-117, A65-118 and A65-119.


A65-119 with RAAF markings removed and US registration N16896 heads a row of Stan Booker's ex-RAAF
Dakotas at Adelaide's Parafield Airport in 1968
.                                                     Photo by Geoff Goodall

    Booker's partner in this and some other ventures was Donald Reidpath, who traded as International Air Ltd, Auckland and Norfolk Island.  Associated company names used by Booker at various times included:
- Stan's Airplane Sales Inc, Fresno, California
- Stan Air Inc, Fresno California
- Stanair Corp, Calgary, Aberta, Canada
- Calgair Inc, Calgary, Alberta
- CalgAir Sales Inc, Calgary, Alberta

       The first Dakota ready to depart Parafield was A65-85. With US registration N16130, Stan Booker departed Parafield in early August 1968 on a sales tour for his C-47s maintained to exceptionally high standards while in Australian military service. He went to Bali, Jakarta, Bangkok, Manila, Taipei and Japan but found that the market for C-47s to be converted into civil airliners was not as good as he hoped.  American airlines were retiring large fleets of DC-3s and it was cheaper to have these ferried out from USA.
       But by September 1968 Stan Booker had seven C-47s and no customers. His soon came up with answer: set up his own airline in Indonesia, where aviation licencing rules hd been relaxed to allowing new-start local airlines.
      With his Indonesian experience, he soon found fellow American entrepreneurs prepared to join him and a new airline Sempati Air Transport at Jakarta. It commenced in March 1969 flying charter with the RAAF C-47s registered as DC-3s PK-JDA to PK-JDG. Within a year or so, Stan was involved with another new airline Trans Nusantara Airways and shared the ex-RAAF DC-3s as well as personally delivering several US corporate DC-3s  to Indonesia for them. Soon management of Sempati Air Transport had changed and Stan Booker had vanished.  His previous American colleagues made enquiries in Australia and USA seeking his whereabouts, but by then Stan was in Laos, running different DC-3s on lucrative US Aid contracts.

The seven C-47B RAAF Dakotas sold to Stan Booker in June 1968:

A65-70 (27129) Registered PK-JDC, first seen painted as PK-JDC at Parafield 19.7.69. Repainted as N16892 the following week.
Departed Parafield 4.8.69 as N16892 on delivery to Indonesia.  US Civil Register added N16892 15.8.68 to Stan Air Inc, Fresno CA.
On arrival Indonesia it was registered PK-JDE 1.8.69 to Safari Air, Jakarta.
Reregistered PK-EHC 6.7.70 to Trans Musantara Airways/Transna. Crashed 19.1.73 landing at Pontianak, Borneo, destroyed by fire.


PK-JDC at Parafield in July 1969.                                                                       Photo by Roger McDonald


A65-70 looking very different as PK-EHC at Singapore-Paya Lebar in November 1971.  Photo by Ron Killick

A65-85 (32878) Registered N16130 6.8.68 to Stan Air Inc, Fresno California. Departed Parafield early 8.68 on sales tour of SE Asia, returning to Indonesia. Registered PK-JDB 7.6.69 to Sempati Air Transport. Reregistered PK-JDG 7.6.70 to Sempati Air Transport.
Between at least 1977-1981 leased to Zamrud Aviation at Denpasar, Bali.  Fate unknown.


N16130 at Parafield on 4.8.68, days before departure.                                                  Photo by Nigel K. Daw


Stan Booker fires up No.1 P&W at Parafield to depart on the sales tour through SE Asia in early August 1968.
Photo by Mike Vicent


N16130 became PK-JDB with Sempati and name "Rama".  Seen at Singapore-Paya Lebar in 1969.
Some interesting emblem has been painted over on the tail.                    Photo: Nigel Daw collection



Sempati changed PK-JDB to PK-JDG for unknown reasons. Seen at Singapore-Seletar in September 1975.
Photo by Geoff Goodall


PK-JDG at Bali-Denpasar in 1981 while on long-term lease to Zamrud.            Photo: Nigel Daw collection


A65-101 (33112) Registered N16893 15.8.68 to Stan Air Inc, Fresno, California. Parked at Parafield with no registration.
Painted as PK-JDD 6.69.  Stan Booker commenced test flights on 19.7.69 with circuits at Parafield and then Adelaide-West Beach Airport, remained parked at Adelaide Airport until 22.7.69 when Stan Booker arrived from Parafield in N16895. N16895 was left at Adelaide while Stan flew PK-JDD to Parafield. Returned to West Beach from Parafield 21.7 and overnighted, returned to Parafield 22.7.69.  Repainted at Parafield as N16893 and departed Parafield 27.7.69 on the ferry to Indonesia, flown by Stan Booker and his partner Don Reidpath, carrying 2 Indonesian pilots and an Indonesian CAA examiner. Landed at Leigh Creek SA, Alice Springs, Darwin, generating a number of SAR Phases due lack of radio contact, Booker claiming he always flew "No SAR". DCA incident report quotes "Captain of N16893 is already under the scrutiny of the Inspector of Air Safety due to his irregular departures from Parafield."

On arrival Indonesia, reverted to PK-JDD, officially registered as such 18.6.69 to Sempati Air Transport.  Did not enter service with Sempati. Parked at Jakarta-Kemayoran, where it was still sitting in 11.70, weathered condition with both registrations readable.
Cancelled from Indonesian Reguister 12.70.


A65-101 as PK-JDD at Adelaide Airport 19.7.69.                                               Photo by Geoff Goodall


Parafield 26.7.69 now marked as N16893 with with PK-JDD painted over. It departed for Indonesia next day.
Photo by Nigel K. Daw

A65-117 (33456) Registered N16894 15.8.68 to Stan Air Inc, Fresno, California. Parked at Parafield with no registration.
Painted as N16894 7.68 a few days before it departed on delivery to Indonesia. Registered PK-JDA 28.5.69 to Sempati Air Transport.
Reregistered PK-EHD during 1970 to Trans Nusantara Airways/Transna. Retired at Jakarta-Kemorayan by 1973.

A65-118 (33457) Registered N16895 15.8.68 to Stan Air Inc, Fresno, California. Parked at Parafield with no registration.
Sold to Weyerhaeuser Philippines Inc, Manila.N16895 painted on aircraft at Parafield 18.7.69. Flew pilot training circuits at Parafield 20.7.69, Stan Booker flew N16895 to Adelaide Airport 22.7.69 where it was parked overnight. Departed Adelaide Airport 6.30am next morning 23.7.69 for Alice Springs as first stop on delivery to Philippines, under command of Captain Leonardo L. Flores, chief pilot of Weyerhaeuser Philippines Inc. This was the Filipino associate of large US timber company Weyerhaeuser International Inc.
Registration PI-C1937 had been allocated 23.7.69 but was not taken up. Remained as N16895 to Weyerhaeuser Philippines Inc.
N16895 was noted at Singapore-Seletar 27.6.71, but was cancelled from the US Civil Register by 1.72.  Fate unknown.

A65-60  (25998) Registered N16891 15.8.68 to Stan Air Inc, Fresno, California. Parked at Parafield with no registration. No sale, left at Parafield with A65-119 after the other five Stan Air Dakotas departed on delivery. Sold to Jetair Australia, ferried to Bankstown 12.69, arrived by 4.12.69. Civil conversion at Bankstown, registered VH-EQN 16.4.70 to Jetair.  See next section: Australian Aid


A65-60 with hand-painted registration N16891 at Bankstown 4.12.69, just ferried from Parafield for Jetair.
Photo by Roger McDonald


A65-60 now resplendent in Jetair Australia scheme, in passenger service at Essendnon in 1970.
Photo by Barrie Colledge

A65-119 (33463) Registered N16896 15.8.68 to Stan Air Inc, Fresno, California. Registration painted on in 7.68. No sale, left at Parafield with A65-60 after the other five Stan Air Dakotas departed on delivery.  Sold to Jetair Australia, ferried to Bankstown 12.69, arrived by 5.12.69. Civil conversion at Bankstown, registered VH-EQO 16.4.70 to Jetair.


At Sydney-Bankstown 4.12.69 just after arrival from Parafield on its ferry flight to Jetair Australia.  
Photo by Roger McDonald


A65-119 became VH-EQO with Jetair. Seen at Bankstown after civil conversion by Hawker de Havilland
Photo by Barrie Colledge

       Stanley Booker, known for good reason as Stan the Man, became a key player in the humanitarian airlift when roads into Phnom Penh were cut, operating numerous DC-3s in Laos and Cambodia, his pilots setting up the Pig Pilots of Phnom Penh association. They flew into Phnom Penh under shelling and rocket attacks from the saurrounding Khmer Rouge. Booker left Laos by the end of the civil war in 1975, returned to USA and took over a  charter company Nevada Airlines as Las Vegas, Nevada.
      He quickly built up the fleet, specialising in tourist flights to the Grand Canyon, mostly with Beech 18s.  After their Martin 404 N40438 crashed at Grand Canyon Airport in November 1979 killing all 44 on board, Nevada Airlines was shut down by the FAA because of serious operational irregularities found during the investigation.
      Stanley T. Booker was killed on 16 March 1984 in his high-performance Lockheed 18 Learstar, which he had also changed to his favourite registration N77777.  The aircraft crashed in a forest on approach to land at Oneonta, NewYork at night in low cloud and fog, no Flight Plan submitted. Stan Booker and his copilot were killed. Found in the wreckage was 3,500 pounds of marajuana.


THE AUSTRALIAN AID DC-3 GIVE-AWAY
DC-3s gifted to other countries - whether they were wanted or not

        This curious and confusing episode had its beginnings when a group of Sydney businessmen invested huge capital to start a new airline to compete with the Australian Government's entrenched Two Airline Policy (TAA and Ansett-ANA). The name was Jetairlines of Australia or Jet Air Australia, which began in Queensland in September 1969.  The concept was to build up an extensive route structure between country towns which would link Brisbane, Sydney, Melbourne and Adelaide via numerous small ports.  The start-up fleet was DC-3s, Bristol Freighters and light twins, operating at a severe financial loss on low-yield country routes, the DC-3s often carrying only 2 or 3 passengers. It seems Jetair planned in the future to drop country routes and use their route licences for direct flights between capital cities using turboprop then jet equipment. However the predictable losses sustained over the first year resulted in Jetair ceasing operations on 27 November 1970.
       The Directors were anxious to achieve the best prices for the sale of Jetair assets, mainly the aircraft.
       Early in 1971, the Federal Government announced a major humanitarian initiative to assist the people in the countries involved in the South East Asian war zone, despite the official denial of any US military participation in Cambodia and Laos, where there were civil wars.  Australia woud donate transport aircraft to countries whose embassies have requested Australian assistance.
       Douglas C-47s were allegedly wanted by these countries, and the Department of Foreign Affairs quickly purchased the retired fleet of Jetair DC-3s, parked at Sydney Airport,  at prices later claimed in Parliament to be well above going rates.  RAAF Dakotas were released to the Department of Foreign Affairs, which sought tenders for their overhaul to civil Certificate of Airworthiness standards, despite most being destined to go to foreign air forces. East West Airlines at Tamworth NSW and Forrester Stephen Aviation at Melbourne-Essendon won the tenders to carry out the overhauls and once again, subsequent Parliamentary debates revealed the cost was well above normal commercial rates.  The 13 collected aircraft, now all designated DC-3s, rather than the requested military C-47s, were now ready for delivery.
      It was around this time that the destinations of the DC-3s were announced, under the auspices of Australian Aid:
Laos Air Force (3), Cambodian Air Force (6), Philippine Air Force (2), Royal Nepal Airways (2)
     They were all delivered by Australian civil pilots on contracts towards the end of 1971.

      Subsequent Parliamentary debate revealed that Cambodia had never requested any aircraft, and questioned the personal friendship between the then Prime Minister and one of the founders of Jetair Australia. The inference was that Australian Aid DC-3 gift program was at least in original concept, a means to realise a good sales price for the entire Jetair DC-3 fleet, rather than individual sales in the commercial market place.  Other questions remain:
      - were the founders of Jetair given some indication that the current Government would assist their new-start airline, which was defying the Government's own Two Airline Policy?  The Jetair Directors seemed optimistic despite any business model showing that the heavy costs of purchasing and converting aircraft which would fly only low-yield country services doomed their airline to fail.
      - The Department of Administrative Services advertisements for the RAAF Dakotas and RAAF Bristol Freighters acquired by Jetair stressed these aircraft must be exported or scrapped. The sale contract documents carried the same restriction, stating that these aircraft could not be re-sold or flown within Australia. It was a DCA requirement to protect the Government's Two Airline Policy by preventing these aircraft being acquired by a new-start airline.  Yet that is exactly what happened with Jetair, when they confidently breached the sales contract by purchasing these ex RAAF aircraft and converting them to civil standard.
      - Why were Australian transport aircraft gifted to Cambodia and Philippines, both large scale recepients of aircraft from US Government in return for allowing their territory to be used by the US military during the SE Asian war period? The two DC-3s to Nepal went straight to the national airline, hardly humanitarian relief - more likely the Colombo Plan support program.

The 13 Australian Aid DC-3s:
The first 6 are the Jetair Australia DC-3s.  Their histories prior to the Jetair collapse in November 1970, are omitted. All six were parked in a line at Sydney Airport , until collected by the Department of Foreign Affairs for the Australia Aid project.

- VH-TAI (9998) Jetair, sold to Department of Foreign Affairs 12.3.71. Departed Essendon 21.9.71 on delivery to  Laos Government, in company with VH-EQB.  Refuelling stops at Leigh Creek SA, Alice Springs, Darwin, Dili (Timor), Denpasar (Bali), Kuching (Borneo), RAAF Butterworth (Malaysia), Bangkok to Vientiane, arriving 26.9.71. Cancelled Australian Register 30.9.71.
To Royal Lao Air Force as 998.  (c/n 9998).


VH-TAI "Thomas Barton" in Jetair's striking colour scheme, at Essendon 1970 while in passenger service.
Photo by Barrie Colledge


VH-TAI at Essendon July 1971 after overhaul for Australian Aid.                     Photo by Roger McDonald

- VH-SBN (10001) Jetair, sold to Department of Foreign Affairs 12.3.71. Delivered 6.9.71 to Cambodian Government.
Cancelled Australian Register 6.9.71.  To Cambodian Air Force as 24139 (original USAAF serial 42-24139)


VH-SBN at Essendon in August 1971 after overhaul for Australian Aid.                 Photo by Graham Bennett

- VH-BUR ( 19934) Jetair, sold to Department of Foreign Affairs 12.3.71. Delivered 14.8.71 to Nepal Government.
Cancelled Australian Register 30.8.71. Registered 9N-AAY 8.71 to Royal Nepal Airways.


VH-BUR at Sydney Airport in September 1970 in Jetair service.                Photo: The Collection p1789-2278

- VH-EQB ( 25826) Jetair, sold to Department of Foreign Affairs 12.3.71. Departed Essendon 21.9.71 on delivery to Vientiane for Laos Government, refuelling stops at Leigh Creek SA, Alice Springs, Darwin, Dili (Timor), Denpasar (Bali), Kuching (Borneo),
RAAF Butterworth (Malaysia), Bangkok to Vientiane, arriving 26.9.71. In company with VH-TAI. Cancelled Australian Register 30.9.71.
to Royal Lao Air Force as 48565 (original USAAF serial 43-48565)
Retained modified cockpit windscreen from its Woomera rocket range days as KJ881.
Released by air force. Registered XU-GAJ Khmer Akas, later Khmer Hansa. Destroyed by rocket attack Phnom Penh 22.2.75.


VH-EQB "John Bovill" at Bankstown in November 1970. Note the heightened cockpit windscreen modification
 to help the crew visually track rocket trajectories when it was at Woomera as KJ881.            Photo by Chris O'Neill


VH-EQB at Essendon in August 1971, waiting to be delivered to Laos.                  Photo by Barrie Colledge


Extract from Keith Meggs' pilot logbook for the delivery of VH-EQB from Essendon to Vientane, Laos
in September 1971 with Captain Ray Overell.



                           VH-EQB now with Royal Lao Air Force as 48565.                                 Photo: Barrie Colledge collection                             


Another view of Royal Lao Air Force 48565.                                                Photo: Barrie Colledge collection


The modified heightened windscreen of XU-GAJ confirms its is ex-VH-EQB.    Photo: Paul Howard collection

- VH-EQN (25998) Jetair, sold to Department of Foreign Affairs 12.3.71. Delivered 14.8.71 to Nepal Government.
Registered 9N-AAX 8.71 to Royal Nepal Airways.  Cancelled Australian Register 30.8.71

- VH-EQO (33463) Jetair, sold to Department of Foreign Affairs 12.3.71. Deliverted to Laos Governmentto Royal Lao Air Force as 77131
(original USAAF serial 44-77131) Cancelled Australian register 30.9.72. Crashed in Laos 1.5.74

- VH-AIC (12076) ex RAAF A65-30. Registered VH-AIC 11.10.71 to Department of Foreign Affairs. Delivered 11.71 to Cambodian Government. Cancelled Australian Register 22.11.71. To Cambodian Air Force as 292 (original USAAAF serial 42-92292)
Air Force acceptance date 28.3.72. Dropped from Air Force strength 6.74, used as parts source

VH-AIG at Essendon in November 1971, before  delivery to Cambodia.                         Photo by Mike Madden

- VH-AID (33097) ex RAAF A65-96. Registered VH-AID 25.10.71 to Department of Foreign Affairs. Delivered 10.71 to Cambodian Government. Cancelled Australian Register 5.11.71. To Cambodian Air Force as 765 (original USAAF serial 44-76765).
Air Force acceptance date 28.3.72.  Badly damaged in ground-loop on takeoff Siem-Reap 31.1.74, written-off.


VH-AID at Essendon 11 August 1971.                                                                 Photo by Peter Kelly


- VH-AIG (9594) ex RAAF A65-14.  Registered VH-AIG 5.9.71 to Department of Foreign Affairs. Delivered 16.11.71 to Cambodian Government.  Cancelled Australian Register 22.11.71. To Cambodian Air Force as 44-23732 (original USAAF serial).
Accepted by Air Force 28.3.72.  Grounded waiting for engine mods at Phnom Penh-Pochentong 8.73-1.74.
Dropped from Air Force strength 6.74, used as parts source


A65-14 at RAAF Laverton in March 1971, just before it was flown out to become VH-AIG.
Photo by Gordon Reid


A65-14 after civil conversion for Australian Aid as VH-AIG, seen at Essendon in November 1971.
Photo by Barrie Colledge



- VH-AIQ (32672) ex RAAF A65-80, retired at RAAF Laverton. Ferried out 4.71 for Department of Foreign Affairs.
Registered VH-AIQ 25.10.71. Delivered to Cambodian Government. Cancelled Australian Register 5.11.71.
To Cambodian Air Force as 340.  (original USAAF serial 44-76340) Air Force acceptance date 28.3.72.
Fitted as VIP transport by installing airline seats, conference room, galley, toilet, sound proofing in 1972.
Right wing damaged in taxying collision with Cessna O-1D at Phnom Penh 1.74.
Crashed landing at Siem-Reap 2.8.74, written-off.


VH-AIQ at Essendon in October 1971.                                                                  Photo by Graham Bennett


- VH-AIX(32880) ex RAAF A65-88. Registered VH-AIX 29.11.71 to Department of Foreign Affairs. Delivered 30.11.71 to Cambodian Government. Cancelled Australian Register 6.12.71. To Cambodian Air Force as 44-67548 (original USAAF serial).
Battle damage to right wing 12.73, repaired 12.73.
Ground-loop landing at Kg Chanang 18.1.74, damaged beyond repair, Written-off. Engines, props and parts salvaged, sent to Pochentong.

- VH-EYB (12037) ex RAAF A65-26. Registered VH-EYB 16.12.72 to Department of Foreign Affairs. Civil conversion completed at Tamworth by East West Airlines 2.72, test flown Tamworth 17.2.73, ferried to Essendon.
Departed Essendon 26.2.72 on delivery to Philippines Government, accompanied by VH-EYC. Arrived Manila 3.3.72.
Cancelled Australian Register 3.4.73. To Philippine Air Force as 292257 (original USAAF serial 42-92257).
PAF 292257 noted at Nichols AFB, Manila 12.75. 12.77.  Sold by Philippine Air Force disposals.
Registered RP-C631 Philippine Aviation Corp/Philair, Manila. Noted at Manila 7.84.


VH-EYB at Tamworth early 1973 on completion of civil conversion for Australian Aid by East West Airlines
Photo by Roger McDonald

- VH-EYC (33294) ex RAAF A65-103. Registered VH-EYC 16.12.72 to Department of Foreign Affairs. Civil conversion completed at Tamworth by East West Airlines 2.72, test flown Tamworth 17.2.73, ferried to Essendon 18.2.73. Departed Essendon 26.2.73 on delivery to Philippines Government, accompanied by VH-EYB.  Cancelled Australian Register 3.4.73.
To Philippine Air Force as 476962 (original USAAF serial 44-76962).
Reportedly never flown by PAF. Noted at Nichols Field, Manila 11.80 in derelict condition, by 3.85 outer wings removed;
Sold by Philippine Air Force disposals. Moved from military area to civil maintenance ramp at Nichols/Manila Airport c1991, poor condition, very weathered PAF paintwork "476962" readable on tail, also "VH-EYC" visible under the tail paintwork. Civil overhaul commenced by 2.92. Fate unknown.


VH-EYC at Essendon in February 1973, ready to depart for the Philippines.                     Photo by Gordon Reid


                          Extract from Keith Meggs' pilot log book for delivery of VH-EYC to Manila in February-March 1972:
                            test flight at Tamworth, ferry to Essendon, then delivery to Philippines, with Captain Col Portway.


The former VH-EYB as PAF 476962 under civil overhaul at Manila Airport in February 1992.
Behind is an ex-RAAF C-130A of Aboitiz Air Transport.                     Photo by Paul Howard

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References:
- Australian Civil Aircraft Register, Department of Civil Aviation
- Aviation Historical Society of Australia Journals: 1968 to 1974
- Mercy Angels of Angkor - The Phnom Penh Airflift 1973-1975, Paul Howard & Bob Hickox, Air Enthusiast issues 29 & 30
- Green Dragon Dougs, Paul Howard, AHSA Aviation Heritage, quarterly, June 2013
- The Douglas DC-3 and its predecessors, J. M. G. Gradidge, Air Britain 1984
- The Douglas DC-3 and its predecessors, Update 1, J. M. G. Gradidge, Air Britain 1987
- SE Asia Civil Aircraft Registers, Ian P. Burnett, Air Britain 1979
- Vickers Viscount and Vanguard, Peter W. Davis, Air Britain 1981
- Convair 240-990, Bo-Goran Lundkvist, Lundkvist Aviation Research 1982
- Douglas DC-6 & DC-7, Bo-Goran Lundkvist, Lundkvist Aviation Research 1980
- Lockheed L-188 & L-1011, Bo-Goran Lundkvist, Lundkvist Aviation Research 1980
- Australian Air Log, monthly journal, editor Geoff Goodall, 1967-1968;
- Essendon Newsletter - Airline RoundUp, monthly journal, editor Gordon Reid 1967-1973
- West Australian Airport Reports, M.W.Prime
- Pacific Islands Aviation Society, editor Allan Bovelt, listings for Indonesia, Papua New Guinea
- Khmer Air Force C-47s/Royal Laos Air Force C-47s listing, Dr. Joe F. Leeker
- Australian DC-3 listing: compiled 1981-1982 by Neville Parnell, Nigel Daw, Mel Davis, Geoff Goodall, Allan Bovelt
- Paul Howard: extensive records on SE Asian civilian transport aircraft


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