Last updated 11 July 2019
DOUGLAS DC-2 IN AUSTRALIA

Including USAAF Douglas C-32s and C-39s during WWII

Compiled by Geoff Goodall

Australian National Airways DC-2 VH-UYB "Pengana" at the ANA terminal Essendon Aerodrome, Melbourne circa 1937.
Photo: Maurice Austin collection


RAAF DC-2 A30-5 over Ballarat Victoria 3 February 1942 while with No.1 Wireless Air Gunners School at RAAF Ballarat.
Photo by RAAF photographer John T. Harrison, courtesy Ben Dannecker collection

           The 1934 Centenary Air Race from London to Australia gained worldwide attention. The crews of 21 competing aircraft battled weather, poor airfields, mechanical problems and fatigue to reach the finishing line at Flemington Racecourse, Melbourne. A significant story was the KLM Douglas DC-2 entry, flown to airline standards and carrying passengers, which matched the performance of the specialised two-seat racing aircraft such as the DH.88 Comets. Even with the DC-2's legendaryforced landing at night on the Abury NSW racecourse, bogged in the muddy surface and pulled free by Albury townsfolk on ropes - it was second aircraft to cross the finish line the next morning.

            Early Australian airlines were restricted to wood and fabric British biplane types because of strong Empire ties and Australian Government "Buy British" policies. By the early 1930s the range of modern American monoplane airliners including the all-metal Douglas DC-2 were generally unavailable. However the KLM DC-2's performance in the air race had a major impact on Australian airline proprietors and aviation authorities alike. Such was the enthusiasm that Mr. G.A.Robinson, founder of New England Airways at Lismore NSW made an offer to KLM of 20,000 on the spot to purchase their air race DC-2, which was politely declined.
            With a Boeing 247D flown by flamboyant Americans Roscoe Turner and Clyde Pangborn third to finish the race the following day, the superiority of the American airliners could no longer be ignored. In November 1935 the Australian Govenment dropped its previous restrictions on the importation of new US and German built aircraft, based on neither country being signatories to the International Convention for Aerial Navigation (predecessor of ICAO).  Import permits could now be issued on the recommendation of the Civil Aviation Branch (predecessor of Department of Civil Aviation)
            Holyman's Airways Pty Ltd immediately applied to CAB for import permits for DC-2s to replace its DH.86 biplanes on their Tasmania-Melbourne-Sydney services.  G.A.Robinson's New England Airways, reformed as Airlines of Australia Ltd applied to import  Stinson Model A trimotors and later a DC-2 and DC-3. Holyman's Airways became Australian National Airways Pty Ltd in November 1936.
             The DC-2s proved an immediate success with Australian airlines, bringing a new world of comfort and reliability to air travel, including the first use of air hostesses.  By the time they entered Australian service, Douglas was offering the enlarged and improved DC-3, four of which were imported prior to WWII.

            The Douglas DC-2 ("Douglas Commercial No.2") was all metal construction apart from fabric control surfaces, powered by two
820 hp Wright Cyclones. Passenger configuration was 12 to 14 seats. Australian National Airways DC-2s carried 14 passengers although for a period an extra passenger seat was trialled before reverting to 14.

The three ANA DC-2s, a DH.86 and DH.89 at Essendon Aerodrome , Melbourne circa 1937


Passenger cabin of ANA DC-2 VH-UXJ at Essendon, October 1937.   Civil Aviation Historical Society


Airlines of Australia DC-2 cockpit.                               Bruce Robertson collection


Out with the old. This 1946 ANA publicity picture of a new DC-4 at Essendon shows the retired DC-2s parked
in the centre of the airfield, along with retired ANA DC-5 VH-ARD.              Barrie Colledge collection


This summary of DC-2 use in Australia is grouped under the following headings:
1934
KLM DC-2 Centenary Air Race London-Melbourne
1936
Australian airline DC-2s
1940
RAAF DC-2 order
1942
Dutch KNILM DC-2s evacuated from Netherlands East Indies
1942
USAAF C-33s and C-39s in Australia with 5th Air Force SWPA
1945
Post-war Australian civil use of former USAAF C-39s
1984
Air Race 50th Anniversary DC-2 flight London-Melbourne


1.  KLM DC-2 entry in the 1934 Centenary Air Race London-Melbourne
                       KLM DC-2 PH-AJU Uiver made history when it was the second aircraft to cross the finish line of the London-Melbourne Centenary Air Race ahead of 19 other competitors including  special racing types. KLM Captains Parmentier and Moll finished the course in 81 flying hours while carrying passengers in a standard airliner, to win the 2,000 first prize of the Handicap Section.
                       Race official Gerry Randall described the KLM entry: "It was most impressive in its simplicity. A circuit, landing, reporting, a  meal, refuelling, a takeoff. There were no histrionics. The pilots wore their KLM uniforms and the quality of their airmanship made a deep impression on me."  The air race success boosted KLM and Netherlands' standing as the world came out of The Great Depresion. Both Douglas and KLM capitalised by releasing a range of promotional "Uiver"mugs, plates, jigsaws and other many other souvenir items.
                       Unfortunately PH-AJU was to be destroyed in a tragic accident only two months later. However the bonds of frienship and gratitude forged by the KLM DC-2 visit are far-reaching for the Dutch community in Australia and between The Netherlands and the town of Albury. This continues to today with a series of civic commemoration events and memorials.

.34
Built by Douglas Aircraft Co Inc at Santa Monica, California. Model DC-2-115A c/n 1317

Ordered by Koninklijke Luchtvaart Maatschappij NV - Royal Dutch Air Lines
25.8.34
Douglas delivery date to KLM

Shipped to Holland, assembled by Fokker at Schiphol Aerodrome, Amsterdam
10.34
Entered KLM service, named Uiver
20.10.34
Departed Mildenhall Aerodrome, London for Melbourne, painted with race number #44, flown by KLM
Captains K.D.Parmentier and J.J.Moll. 
60,000 spectators watched the departures, commencing at 6.30am at 45 second intervals. PH-AJU was seventh to depart at 6.34am.
23.10.44
Late evening on the final leg inbound to Melbourne, caught in severe storm over northern Victoria and crew became unsure of position.  They held over the lights of a town and such was the public excitement over the air race that the town electricity suppy was interrupted to spell out "Albury" in morse code. Albury had established airfield so townfolk assembled on the racecourse to light a landing strip with car headlights.
PH-AJU landed at 1.20 am without damage but became bogged in the muddy surface. The DC-2 was pulled free by the citizens of Albury on ropes. In daylight Parmentier and Moll took off for Melbourne in a lightened aircraft, leaving their passengers behind at Albury.
24.10.34
PH-AJU crossed the finish line at Flemington Racecourse, Melbourne at 10.54am (local time), the second contestant to finish behind C.W.A.Scott and T.Campbell Black's DH.88 Comet G-ACSS Grosvenor House.
The DC-2 elapsed time from London was 90 hrs 13 mins, flying time 81 hrs 10 mins.
It then landed at the nearby Laverton RAAF Station which was prepared to handle the race aircraft.
1.11.34
Departed Melbourne for the return flight to Amsterdam.  The crew wished to stop to thank Albury's citizens for their remarkable help during their forced landing inbound to Melbourne. The nearest airfield capable of handling the DC-2 was Cootamundra NSW, where a civic reception was held for their visit.
PH-AJU landed at Cootamundra at 10.30am with 15 on board, including race competitors Jean Batten and Colonel Roscoe Turner. Departed at 11.30am for Canberra for an official luncheon.

PH-AJU returned to Amsterdam to a welcoming crowd of 50,000. The crew's achievements during the air race had made them national heroes.
19.12.34
PH-AJU departed Schiphol Aerodome on a special KLM flight to Batavia carrying Netherlands East Indies Christmas mail. PH-AJU was chosen to operate the service, to promote its success in the recent MacRobertson air race.
20.12.34
Crashed in desert at Rutbah Wells, Iraq after being caught in a severe storm. All 7 on board were killed, the wreck had burned and most mail was scattered by the winds.

PH-AJU had departed Cairo at 23:30 local time bound for Baghdad. In the vicinity of Rutbah the aircraft entered a storm and descended. It impacted the ground, crashed and burst into flames.


PH-AJU "Uiver" at RAAF Laverton near Melbourne at the end of the MacRobertson Air Race from London.
Kevin O'Reilly collection


Because there was no airfield at Albury, the crew of "Uiver"made Cootamundra NSW their first stop of the
return flight from Melbourne to Amsterdam. A large crowd turned out for the visit on 1 November 1934
during which the crew gave their sincere thanks to the people of Albury.         Ben Dannecker collection


A wonderful candid photograph showing PH-AJU at Batavia on 8 November 1934, during the return flight to
Amsterdam following the air race.  The admiring crowd turns to greet the arriving KLM crew.      
Photo: Jacques AC Bartels Collection
via Noel Jackling


Two views of the sad remains of PH-AJU in the Iraq desert near Rutbah Wells two months later.
Both Matson Collection, via Bob Livingstone



2. Four pre-war Australian airline DC-2s

               DC-2                VH-USY      Bungana

Built by Douglas Aircraft Co Inc at Santa Monica, California. Model DC-2-185 c/n 1580
28.1.36
Captain Ivan Holyman, Managing Director of Holyman's Airways Pty Ltd announced the order for a DC-2 which would be shipped to Australia on the SS Hauraki.
10.4.36
Arrived at Port Melbourne from California as deck cargo on board SS Hauraki.

Moved by road to Essendon Aerodrome where assembled in the Holymans Airways hangar under the supervision of Douglas test pilot Major Victor E. Bertrandia and a Douglas engineer who has accompanied the aircrat on the sea voyage
28.4.36
First flight Essendon by Major Bertrandia and HAL senior pilot Captain Ken Frewin
29.4.36
Registered VH-USY Holyman's Airways Pty Ltd, Launceston Tasmania,
Named Bungana, aboriginal for Chief
29.4.36
Australian CofA issued. 14 passenger seats
30.4.36
Began a series of demonstration flights, including a trial Melbourne-Sydney fight on 2.5.36 with a direct flying time of 2hr 25 mins.
5.5.36
Commenced reguar passenger service with an 8am Sydney-Canberra-Melbourne under Captain Frewin

13.5.36 Australian National Airways Pty Ltd was registered in Melbourne with a nominal capital of 500,000 from Holyman's Airways Pty Ltd, Adelaide Airways Ltd and several steamship companies.
Merged operations of Holyman's Airways and Adelaide Airways as ANA to commence 2 November 1936
1.11.36
Ownership transferred to Australian National Airways Pty Ltd,. Melbourne Vic
12.38
Flew an Imperial Airways charter Melbourne-Calcutta return to collect Christmas air mail for Australia
8.2.40
Damaged in forced landing near Dimboola Vic due starboard engine fire. The burning engine fell out of its mounts at low altitude just before the aircraft landed in a farm paddock, sustaining damage to belly and tailplane. No injuries. Captain Norman W. Croucher, FO Arthur Lovell, Hostess Mavis Matters.
Wings were removed and aircraft moved by road to Essendon for repair by ANA.
2.2.42
Damaged at Forrest WA when port undercarriage struck a large stone and collapsed, forcing a strut into the   wing structure. No injuries. Captain John W. Knowling
19.2.42
Starboard undercarriage collapsed at end of landing run at Brisbane-Archerfield Qld. Reportedly temporarily repaired using a wing loaned by USAAF.
8.7.42
Damaged by exploding land mine King Island aerodrome, part of wartime fortifications. No injuries. Captain John W. Bennett, FO Bill Freeland.  Port wing replaced by a unit loaned by RAAF
15.1.43
Damaged Cairns Qld while operating a Directorate of Air Transport charter Townsville-Port Moresby.  While avoiding a bogged aircraft on the soft airfield surface, VH-USY's undercarriage sank in mud damaging fuselage, wing tip, engine cowlings and propellers
10.9.46
Last revenue service, Sydney-Melbourne. Captain George Totolis, FO Jim Farrell, Hostess Anita Crowley.
11.9.46
Withdrawn from service at Essendon by ANA: airframe flying time 29,511 hours

Stripped of parts, parked near the reservoir in the centre of Essendon airfield with the other surviving ANA DC-2s and DC-5 VH-ARD.

ANA donated VH-USY's instrument panel to the Museum of Applied Science and Arts, Melbourne.
It was later transferred to the collection of the Museum of Victoria
11.12.47
Struck-off Civil Register
.48
Sold for scrap
.48
Fuselage acquired by K.Dallas, Red Cliffs Vic. Moved by truck to Red Cliffs near Mildura where the fuselage was cut off rear of the cockpit and converted to a caravan.
- The nose section was sold to G.S.Beacham, Nangiloc Vic, who used parts on a motor boat Bungana.
- Electrical cabling and switching was used in a travelling movie projector which toured country towns.
- The name Bungana was cut out of the nose metal and made into a name plate. In 1979 it was donated to the Launceston Airport museum collection.


Melbourne citizens wearing their Sunday best for the new DC-2's public unveiling at Essendon April 1936.
Photo John Hewson via Fred Niven collection


"Bungana" at Essendon 1936 with Holyman's Airways Ltd "HAL" flag on the tail.       Ed Coates collection

March 1937 VH-USY makes the first ANA DC-2 Perth-Adelaide service . It took all day with stops at Ceduna,
Forrest and Kalgoorlie but was a big improvement over the biplane service with night stops at Forrest each way.
Captain Harry Baker at left, First Officer Bill Heath far right with radio operator W.E. Lauder-Cridge, hostess
Gladys Allen.  Note "Australian National Airways" on the door.                             CAHS Mac Job collection






Retired at Essendon 1947 with other ANA DC-2s waiting to be scrapped.
Photo by Bob Fripp


               DC-2                VH-UXJ      Loongana
10.7.36
Built by Douglas Aircraft Co Inc at Santa Monica, California. Model DC-2-199 c/n 1561

Ordered by Holyman's Airways Pty Ltd as their second DC-2.
(During 1936 Holyman's Airways and Adelaide Airways Ltd agreed to merge. On 13.5.36 Australian National Airways Pty Ltd was registered in Melbourne with a nominal capital of 500,000 from Holyman's Airways Pty Ltd, Adelaide Airways Ltd and several steamship companies.
Merged operations of Holyman's Airways and Adelaide Airways as ANA to commence 2 November 1936)
19.9.36
US CofA issued
30.11.36
Arrived at Port Melbourne from California as deck cargo on board SS Hauraki.

Moved by road to Essendon Aerodrome where assembled in the ANA hangar.
4.12.36
First test flight Essendon by ANA Captain Clarrie Scott
4.12.36
Registered VH-UXJ  Australian National Airways Pty Ltd,. Melbourne Vic
Named Loongana, aboriginal for Swift. The name had also been used by a well-known Bass Strait ferry boat between Melbourne and Tasmania.
4.12.36
Australian CofA issued. 14 passenger seats. It was fitted with floatation gear because it was intended to be used mainly on the original Holyman's Airways routeacross Bass Strait between Melbourne and Tasmania.
5.12.36
Commenced revenue service
20.1.39
Nominal change of ownership to Airlines of Australia Ltd, Sydney NSW
1.39
Hired over next 6 months by Guinea Airways Ltd, Adelaide when needed for the Adelaide-Darwin route to replace their Lockheed 14 VHABI which crashed at Katherine NT on 19.1.39.
21.9.39
Ownership transferred back to Australian National Airways Pty Ltd, Melbourne Vic
14.2.42
Struck aerodrome boundary fence during landing on wet surface at Mackay Qld. No injuries.
Captain T. E.Shersby, FO Jim Turner, hostess Donaldson.
5.5.42
Struck aerodrome boundary fence during landing on wet surface at Mackay Qld. No injuries.
Captain Lou Lohse, FO Arthuer Malpass
30.12.42
Starboard undercarriage partially collapsed taxying at Essendon, wing tip damage. No injuries.
Captain Doug R. Way, FO Frank Fischer
27.7.46
Both outer wings damaged in a ground loop, location not recored
4.10.46
Last revenue service. 
10.46
Stripped of parts, parked near the reservoir in the centre of Essendon airfield with the other surviving ANA DC-2s and DC-5 VH-ARD.
19.12.47
Struck-off Civil Register
.48
Broken-up for scrap


VH-UXJ Loongana at Essendon outside the ANA terminal in 1937.                    Frank Walters collection


Loongana arrives at Essendon pre-war on a passenger service.                 Geoff Goodall collection


VH-UXJ in wartime camouflage at Wyndham WA  on a military charter during 1942. 
Captain Doug Secombe is on right, Dick Probyn centre.            Photo via Bruce Robinson


VH-UYB later in WWII with camouflage removed but military fin flash.           Roger McDonald collection


               DC-2                VH-UYB        Pengana
15.4.37
Built by Douglas Aircraft Co Inc at Santa Monica, California. Model DC-2-210 c/n 1563

Ordered by Australian National Airways Pty Ltd, Melbourne Vic
20.4.37
First flight Santa Monica

Shipped to Melbourne as deck cargo on board SS Limerick
2.7.37
Registered VH-UYB  Australian National Airways Pty Ltd, Melbourne Vic
2.7.37
First test flight Essendon after assembly, ANA Captains Harry Baker and Len Diprose
2.7.37
Australian CofA issued. 14 passenger seats
4.7.37
Entered ANA service: Melbourne-Adelaide-Ceduna-Forrest-Kalgoorlie-Perth
1.39
Hired over next 6 months by Guinea Airways Ltd, Adelaide when needed on the Adelaide-Darwin route to replace their Lockheed 14 VHABI which crashed at Katherine NT on 19.1.39.
30.6.39
Ownership transferred to Airlines of Australia Ltd, Sydney NSW
21.9.39
Ownership transferred back to Australian National Airways Pty Ltd, Melbourne Vic
28.9.39
Forced landing in Cooks River, adjacent to Mascot Aerodrome, Sydney after power loss immediately after takeoff. Captain Doug R.Way, FO Andy Munro, Hostess Dorothy Webster, no injuries
Aircraft was painted as Airlines of Australia and name Pengana.

Salvaged, damaged airframe sent to Melbourne by ship. Repaired by ANA at Essendon
9.12.39
Test flight Essendon after repairs completed
24.12.40
Wing tip damaged when struck ground during landing at Mount Gambier SA in a strong gusty crosswind.
No injuries, Captain Arthur Lovell
11.12.41
Arrived in New Guinea on a RAAF charter
18.11.42
Damaged in ground collision while parked at Townsville-Garbut Field. Repaired using two outer wings supplied by the Garbutt USAAF Depot
17.8.46
Withdrawn from service. Total flying hours 29,511 hours
11.12.47
Stripped of parts and parked near the reservoir in the centre of Essendon airfield with the other surviving ANA DC-2s
19.12.47
Struck-off Civil Register
.48
Broken-up for scrap. 


Sun glare off the polished metal finish of VH-UYB "Penaga" at the Airlines of Australia terminal Sydney 1937.
Frank Walters collection


Maylands Aerodrome Perth circa 1939.                                                      Merv Prime collection


An ANA posed publicity picture from around 1938.                       Buce Robinson collection via Fred Niven


VH-UYB's forced landing in Cooks River on the boundary of Mascot aerodrome Sydney in September 1939.
At this time "Pengana" had Airlines of Australia markings.                                  Ed Coates Collection


              DC-2                VH-UYC       Kyeema
.37
Built by Douglas Aircraft Co Inc at Santa Monica, California. Model DC-2-210 c/n 1566
14.4.37
G.A.Robinson, Managing Director of Airlines of Australia Ltd announced the purchase of two new Douglas airliners, a DC-2 for delivery that June and a DC-3 at the end of the year.

In March 1937 ANA had acquired financial control of AoA, the two airlines initially continuing to operate under their separate names but on integrated services. ANA covered Melbourne-Adelaide-Perth and Tasmania, AoA Melbourne-Sydney-Brisbane-Townsville.
AoA was finally absorbed into ANA effective 1 July 1942

DC-2 shipped to Melbourne as deck cargo on board SS Waiotapu

Moved by road from Port Melbourne to Essendon Aerodrome for assembly by ANA
30.7.37
Registered VH-UYC Airlines of Australia Ltd, Sydney NSW
30.7.37
Australian CofA issued. 14 passenger seats
1.8.37
Entered commercial service with AOA on their Sydney-Brisbane route
1.12.37
Ownership transferred to Australian National Airways Pty Ltd, Melbourne Vic
19.1.38
Forced landing in a paddock near Somerton Vic just north of Melbourne . No injuries,
Captain P.T.L.Taylor. Minor damage repaired on site and aircraft flown out.
25.10.38
Crashed Mount Dandenong near Melbourne Vic. All 18 on board were killed.

The aircraft overflew Essendon in cloud inbound from Adelaide and struck trees on slopes near the peak of Mount Dandenong near Olinda, shearing off wings and tailplane before crashing in flames. 
Captain A.C.D.Webb, FO Alan J. Steen, trainee pilot Phillip Pring, Hostess Elva Jones and 14 passengers. Radio navigation aids to allow pilots to accurately home on airports had not yet been installed in Australia.

A detailed summary of the accident, the subsequent enquiry and its impact on the Australian airways system can be found in the highy recommended book"Air Crash" Volume 1 (Aerospace Publications 1991) by Australian air safety expert Macarthur Job.


VH-UYC Kyeema at Essendon on 30 October 1937 with Airlines of Australia motif under the cockpit.
Photo: Civil Aviation Historical Society collection


VH-UYC at Maylands Aerodrome, Perth 1938 in front of the former West Australian Airways hangar.
Photo: Australian Aircraft Restoration Group collection


"Kyeema" at the Airlines of Australia terminal at Archerfield Aerodrome, Brisbane.    Merv Crowe collection

Parafield Aerodrome, Adelaide 1938                                                                           David Daw collection



3.  Ten former Eastern Airlines DC-2s purchased in 1940 for the Royal Australian Air Force
                      
                     When WWII broke out in September 1939, Australian political and military complacency had left the RAAF severely under equpped for combat and with no useful transport capability.  Four DC-3s were immediately taken over from ANA and Airlines of Australia and given RAAF serials A30-1 to A30-4.
                     The British Purchasing Commission in Washington DC reported a lengthy delay in acquiring the preferred Dougas C-47 transports for Britain or Australia because of large US military orders already placed. After negotiation with manufacturers and American aircraft brokers, the commission recommended that the Australian Government purchase of the remaining 10 Eastern Airlines DC-2s recently retired from airline service. They were being offered as a package with a substantial spare parts holding by established aircraft brokers Charles H. Babb Co, Grand Central Air Terminal, Glendale California.
                      It was a compromise. but the DC-2s were available immediately and early shipping to Australia could be arranged. The Australian War Cabinet agreed and the BPC purchased them on behalf of the Australian Government. They joined the RAAF as A30-5 to A30-14 and were to prove invaluable throughout the war as freight and personnel transports, submarine patrols, patroop training, wireless air gunner operator training and other tasks.

Eastern Air Lines postcard from 1935 shows NC14970 over New York City. This DC-2 became RAAF A30-13.
Ed Coates Collection

            DC-2                    A30-5
.34
Built by Douglas Aircraft Co Inc at Santa Monica, California. Model DC-2-112 c/n 1287
10.34
Registered NC13737 General Air Lines Inc, New York NY
15.12.34
Renamed Eastern Air Lines Inc, New York NY
.40
Sold to Australian Government
20.9.40
Shipped ex USA as deck cargo on board MV City of Sydney
18.11.40
Taken on RAAF charge as A30-5.  Assembled by ANA at Essendon Aerodrome, Melbourne
2.12.40
Serviceable at ANA
6.12.40
Received No.1 Aircraft Depot, Laverton ex ANA for wireless mods
12.12.40
Pilot log: Laverton local flight, P/O Peter J.Gibbes
27.12.40
Torn from moorings on ground by strong winds, port and stbd wing tips damaged
12.1.41
Received No.1 Wireless Air Gunner School, Ballarat
13.2.42
Pilot log: Ballarat local flight, Flt Lt Basil B. Daish, P/O Peter J.Gibbes
20.5.42
Issued ANA Essendon ex 1WAGS for mods
1.6.42
Received 3WAGS Maryborough ex ANA
4.7.42
Damaged landing Maryborough.  Brakes locked, aircraft swung and struck obstructions on the side of the runway. Starboard tailplane, elevator and flap damaged. No injuries. pilot W/O Bert Starkey
22.7.42
A30-5 allotted to 36 Sqn when serviceable. Training equipment in A30-5 to be transfered to A30-13.
39.42
Issued to No. 36 Squadron, Essendon ex 3WAGS
13.9.42
Collected at Archerfield by 36 Sqn crew F/Lt Stewart Devine and copilot LAC Foers. Departed for Port  Moresby via refuelling stops at Rockhampton and Townsville. Overnighted at Townsville
14.9.42
Departed Townsville for Port Moresby via refuelling stop at Cooktown. Departure Cooktown was after the latest time to reach Moresby before last light . Arrived over Port Moresby in the dark and Devine flew an incorrect approach circuit during which the aircraft struck a hill and was destroyed
14.9.42

Crashed into hill near Seven Mile Strip, Port Moresby, New Guinea.
Struck hill during night landing approach, exploded in flames destoying the aircraft and its cargo.
F/Lt S.Devine, LAC Foers, F/Sgt Alber, Sgt Daily, Sgt Beitz (American serviceman passenger) killed.


A30-5 passes Lake Wendouree on a sortie from RAAF Ballarat on 13 February 1942, in metallic finish with
yellow training bands on fuselage and wings.       Photo by John T. Harrison via Ben Dannecker coillection


            DC-2                  A30-6, "VHCRJ", VH-ADQ Mungana, VH-AEN Mungana
.34
Built by Douglas Aircraft Co Inc at Santa Monica, California. Model DC-2-112 c/n 1259
4.10.34
Registered NC13733 General Air Lines Inc, New York NY
15.12.34
Renamed Eastern Air Lines Inc, New York NY
.40
Sold to Australian Government
20.9.40
Shipped ex USA as deck cargo on board MV City of Sydney
6.12.40
Taken on RAAF charge. Received ANA Essendon ex USA for assembly
12.12.40
Received No.1 Aircraft Depot Laverton ex ANA for wireless equipment wiring
13.1.41
Issued No.1 Wireless Air Gunners School, Ballarat ex 1AD
27.3.41
Issued to Signals School, Point Cook
13.4.41
Issued to 1AD  ex Signals School
16.10.41
Issued 1WAGS Ballarat ex 1AD
7.12.41
Ran through fence during landing, minor damage
18.8.42
Allotted to 36 Sqn ex 1WAGS.  Instructional equipment to be removed prior to delivery.
20.8.42
Received No.36 Squadron, Essendon for transport duties
8.42
Directorate of Air Transport Allied Air Forces issued radio callsign VHCRJ which was painted on the aircraft
12.42
36 Squadron moved base to Townsville with detachments at Essendon and New Guinea
23.12.42
Crashed landing at Stock Route Strip Townsville Qld.
23.12.42
Damaged aircraft received No.12 Repair and  Salvage Unit, Townsville-Garbutt Field

Damage assessed as:
Mainplanes: port and starboard damaged beyond repair
Fuselage: right side of cockpit completely wreck extending to cabin bulkhead,
                left side forward fuselage slight damage, rear left side damaged
Empennage: port tailplane damaged beyond repair
Fin and rudder slighly damaged
Centre section: badly damaged beyond RAAF repair limits
Undercarriage: damaged beyond repair
Cockpit instruments: all smashed including Sperry panel
Engines and propellers: starboard beyond repair, port badly damaged but repairable
29.4.43
Allotted ANA Essendon for repair. Delay arranging transport from Townsville to Melbourne
24.8.43
Damaged airframe received ANA Essendon.
9.10.43
On completion of repairs aircraft to be loaned to Department of Civil Aviation for issue to civil airlines
26.11.43
Aircraft completed at ANA Essendon. 14 passenger seats.
26.11.43
Registered VH-ADQ  Commonwealth of Australia, operated by Australian National Airways Pty Ltd, Melbourne Vic
27.11.43
Entered commercial service with ANA. Named Mungana
2.12.43
Pilot log: Brisbane-Sydney-Melbourne, Cpt Knowling, FO Charles D. Pratt
4.12.43
Extensively damaged in forced landing near Bendigo Vic.
Scheduled ANA Brisbane-Sydney-Melbourne service. Radio compass was u/s and very poor radio reception resulted in crew becoming unsure of position inbound to Melbourne with an ETA of 0320 Local time. After circling a large town in the dark, by time 0420 fuel state was so low that a forced landing was made in a clear area near the town.  Flares were dropped to illuminate a farm paddock. Towards the end of the landing roll the aircraft struck a fence and dense trees, tearing off the undercarriage and outer wings. The right side of the cockpit was crushed, killing FO Herbert V.Kenna. Captain Kevin T.E.Shersby, Hostess June Westbrook and 6 passengers escaped with minor injuries.

Wreck moved by road to ANA Essendon
12.4.44
Registration application: Australian National Airways Pty Ltd, Melbourne Vic.
DCA allocates new registration VH-AEN
16.4.44
Weighed on DCA scales at Essendon on completion of rebuild.
16.4.44
Approved by DCA for ANA use on an "Authority To Operate" pending formal issue of CofA
17.4.44
VH-AEN entered commercial service, Essendon-Parafield-Ceduna-Forrest-Kalgoorlie-Perth.
18.4.44
Port undercarriage collapsed while taxying at Maylands Aerodrome, Perth for departure to Kalgoorlie. Repairs completed 21.4.44
25.4.44
Forced landing 18 miles west of Kalgoorlie at 8.15am, no damage.  The cockpit fuel tank selector switch had failed while on a scheduled Perth-Kalgoorlie-Melbourne service. VH-AEN had departed Maylands at 6.25am WST, following a delay due to fog.
Captain Arthur Lovell, FO Keith L.Richards.  The passengers were taken to Kalgoorlie by road.
ANA engineers and parts were flown from Maylands to Kalgoorlie in MMA's Cessna C34 VH-UZU, then to forced landing site by road.
Cpt. Lovell flew the DC-2 out to Kalgoorlie at 5.30pm that afternoon
30.4.44
CofA issued. 17 passenger seats

Formal certification delayed due to DCA concern over correct model of this DC-2. DCA Head Office wrote to ANA Chief Engineer asking for its origins. His reply states this aircraft is a rebuild of DC-2 VH-ADQ:
- fuselage, centre-section and engines are original Eastern Airlines purchased from RAAF as A30-6;
- mainplanes including ailerons are from VH-ADZ ex KNILM;
- tail unit and undercarriage are new from RAAF spares stocks;
- wheels, tyres and tubes were locally manufactured.
5.5.44
CofR issued VH-AEN Australian National Airways Pty Ltd, Melbourne Vic
ANA named the aircraft Mungana
8.46
Based Perth-Guildford operating ANA Perth-Kalgoorlie-Forrest-Ceduna-Adelaide scheduled services to supplement the ANA DC-4 services Perth-Adelaide direct. VH-AEN still based Perth by 1.47
18.4.47
CofA expired, not renewed by ANA. Retired at Essendon and advertised for sale
9.1.48
Change of ownership: New Holland Airways, Sydney NSW

Ferried Essendon-Mascot by New Holland Airways founder Gregory Board.
2.4.48
CofA renewed Mascot

New Holland Airways specialised in charters bringing European migrants to Australia, mostly from Rome and Athens.  See The Migrant Caper on this site

Gregory Board later wrote:
“I bought the old DC-2 VH-AEN from Australian National Airways at Essendon together with the DC-5 VH-CXC. Both airplanes were in good condition although their airworthiness certificates were expired. They came absolutely complete with all radio, catering equipment and even blankets for the passengers. Both aircraft were parked at Essendon when I bought them and I took them up to Camden or Bankstown, I cannot remember which, as our maintenance section was originally at Camden and later moved to Bankstown. I also had for New Holland Airways around that time, about three Lockheed Hudsons and  Lockheed Lodestar VH-GRB, as well as an Italian registered DC-3 I- TROS. All of these aircraft were used to transport immigrants from Rome, Athens and Singapore."
9.5.48
Swung off runway landing Darwin NT, badly damaged. No injuries.
28.5.48
Letter to DCA from New Holland Airways advising that the company is in discussions with their insurance company whether to repair AEN at Darwin.
7.9.49
Letter to DCA from New Holland Airways advises VH-AEN will not be repaired
3.12.48
Struck-off Civil Register


A30-6 callsign VHCRJ after the landing accident at Stock Route Strip near Townsville 23 December 1942.
Neil Follett collection


The short-lived VH-ADQ afer its night forced landing on the outskirts of Bendigo Vic on 4 December 1943


Such was its need for aircraft to maintain services during WWII, ANA rebuilt VH-ADQ with new registration VH-AEN.
Seen from the Essendon ANA passenger terminal roof observation deck in 1945.           Fred Niven collection



Essendon 1947.                                                                                         Geoff Goodall collection


            DC-2                  A30-7
.34
Built by Douglas Aircraft Co Inc at Santa Monica, California. Model DC-2-112 c/n 1290
11.34
Registered NC13740 Eastern Air Lines Inc, New York NY

Sold to Australian Government, shipped to Australia as deck cargo on MV Port Chalmers
21.12.40
Taken on RAAF charge as A30-7.  Received ANA Essendon ex USA for assembly
31.12.40
Received 1AD Laverton ex ANA
2.3.41
Issued No.1 Wireless Air Gunners School, Ballarat ex 1AD
7.6.41
Received 2WAGS Parkes ex 1WAGS
15.6.42
Crashed at Parkes Aerodrome NSW, complete writeoff.
Stalled from 200 feet during day circuit training. 3 aircrew and 8 RAAF passengers on board were injured.


              DC-2                A30-8
.34
Built by Douglas Aircraft Co Inc at Santa Monica, California. Model DC-2-112 c/n 1291
11.34
Registered NC13781 Eastern Air Lines Inc, New York NY

Sold to Australian Government, shipped to Australia
3.1.41
Taken on RAAF charge as A30-8.  Received ANA Essendon ex USA for assembly
9.1.41
Received 1AD Laverton ex ANA
2.2.41
Received Signals School, Point Cook ex 1AD
1.6.41
Issued No.2 Wireless Air Gunner School, Parkes ex Signals School
26.1.42
Shot down by Japanse fighters, ditched in sea Sumba Strait, Netherlands East Indies.
The DC-2 flown by 2WAGS crew F/O Noel Webster and copilot Sgt Lionel Van Praag who had volunteered for an urgent special mission to carry USAAF P-40 Kittyhawk ground crews and aircraft spares from Australia to Sourabaya during the Japanese invasion of Netherlands East Indies.
It was attacked on the return flight after departing Sourabaya for Koepang, Timor then Darwin.

The DC-2 was badly damaged and was ditched at sea in the Sumba Strait between Flores island and Sumba Island. Van Praag and Corporal Fred Mason had bullet flesh wounds. Radio operator Sgt Eric Picker continued sending morse code SOS signals with their position until the ditching when he locked the morse key down to send continuous distress signal.  The 4 crew abandoned the aircraft just before it sank, floating away with just a tin of drinking water and their Mae West life jackets tied together. One Mae West had been holed by a Japanse bullet.
They drifted together in the sea for 33 hours, losing consciousness and hallucinating, at times firing their service revolvers at circling sharks which were brushing their legs, before being washed up on an island, all suffering coral cuts while reaching the beach. They were found by natives who cared for them before carrying them for 3 days on stretchers and mountain ponies, using their life vests as saddles, to a village. Letters were sent  by native runners to the Dutch Controller for the area, Mr.Hoen. He brought a missionary with medical training whio treated their wounds and severe suburn. Darwin was eventually contacted by radio.

On 12.2.42 the four crew of A30-8 were evacuated from Waingapu island airfield by a RAAF Hudson flown from Darwin by Flt Lt Ron Cornfoot. Mrs.Hoen and their 3 children were persuaded to leave ahead fo the inevitable Japanese occupation of the area. Because of the passenger and fuel weight Cornfoot wanted to unload his 250 pound bombs but RAAF Darwin refused by radio because bombs were in short supply. Mr. Hoen bravely elected to stay to carry out his duty for the local population. He became a POW but survived the war to be reunited with his family. 

Webster and Van Praag were awarded George Medal for bravery.

For more on Lionel Van Praag's outstanding flying career, see THE MIGRANT CAPER on this site


A30-8 soon after entering RAAF service, still with airline curtains in the windows.
John Hopton Collection


A30-8 in all metal finish with yellow training bands on wings and rear fuselage.      John Hopton Collection


            DC-2                  A30-9, "VHCRK"
.34
Built by Douglas Aircraft Co Inc at Santa Monica, California. Model DC-2-112 c/n 1292
12.34
Registered NC13782 Eastern Air Lines Inc, New York NY

Sold to Australian Government, shipped to Australia
3.2.41
Taken on RAAF charge as A30-9.  Received ANA Essendon ex USA for assembly
9.2.41
Received 1AD Laverton ex ANA
24.3.41
Tailplane blown against slope while taxying at RAAF Cressy in strong winds. Fin and rudder damaged
26.3.41
Received No.1 Wireless Air Gunner School, Ballarat ex 1AD
13.2.42
Pilot log: Ballarat local flight, F/Lt H.R.Beeston
25.2.42
A30-9 departed Essendon for Daly Waters NT flown by 1WAGS crew F/Sgt Frank Nolen and Warrant Officer Alan Randall. Carried urgent medical supplies for the many military personnel and civilians evacuated from Darwin to Daly Waters following the first Japanese air raids on Darwin.
9.3.42
Issued to 3WAGS Maryborough ex 1WAGS
18.5.42
Issued ANA Archerfield for overhaul
30.7.42
Received 2WAGS Parkes ex ANA
14.8.42
Received No.36 Squadron, Essendon ex 2WAGS. Squadron code "RE-K"
8.42
Directorate of Air Transport Allied Air Forces issued radio callsign VHCRK which was painted on the aircraft
8.11.42
Received 1AD Laverton ex 36 Sqn for preparation for Parachute Training Unit
20.11.42
Issued Parachute Training Unit, Richmond ex 1AD
24.6.43
Received ANA Mascot ex PTU for overhaul prior to issue to 36 Sqn
12.8.43
Received 36 Sqn Essendon ex ANA Mascot.
36 Squadron's three remaining DC-2s had been replaced by C-47s on most transport duties. A squadron detachment was established at RAAF Richmondto operate the DC-2s for the Parachute Training Unit based there while still being available to 36 Squadron as required. This continued well into 1944.
23.4.44
Received PTU Richmond ex 37 Sqn
14.12.44
Received 2AD Richond ex PTU for storage
15.11.45
Minister for Air approved free issue of A30-9, -11, -12 & -14 to Department of Civil Aviation for use by civil airlines
16.1.46
Free issue declined by DCA. The Department did not want DC-2s returning to post-war regular public transport  passenger operations when large stocks of disposals C-47s were becoming available.
A30-9 to be offered to Commonwealth Disposals Commission

Commonwealth Disposals Commission document dated 8.5.46:
"Department of Air has declared available four Douglas DC-2 aircraft and 13 Wright Cyclone engines, type GR.1820-F2B as fitted to DC-2 airframes. Approval is sought for (a) Treasury to be approached to make a free issue of two complete aircraft and two spare engines with associated propellors to the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research. (b) To sell by tender to the aviation industry the remaining and future arisings of aircraft and engines of this type. 
Department of Civil Aviation will grant a licence for these aircraft to operate on secondary routes only, i.e., intra-state journeys, until April, 1947, when the matter is to be reviewed and it is anticipated they will then be withdrawn from passenger operation.  Overhaul and conversion for passenger use is estimated to cost 7,000.
The matter was discussed with Group Captain Wiggins, DCA technical officer, who advised that his Department has been desirous of having tests carried out by C.S.I.R. in respect to fatigue in metal aircraft, more especially since metal fatigue was found to be the cause of the crash of a Stinson aircraft*.  The two machines concerned, he stated, were admirable for the purpose having completed some 18,000 hours flying.  The aircraft will not fly again but will be dissembled and each major section - stub wings, outer wings, tail unit, controls, etc., re-erected as though on an aircraft and will the be subjected to various tests.  He stated that no authority throughout the world has yet given an opinion on the safe life of Metal Transport Aircraft.”

* The Stinson aircraft was ANA Stinson A VH-UYY converted from trimotor to two 600hp P&W R-1340-S3H1 engines, which broke up in flight and crashed Redesdale Vic 31.1.45.
25.7.46
A30-9 and A30-14 approved by Treasury for free issue to Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, Sydney NSW.
20.8.46
2 Maintenance Group to pack and transport aircraft at no cost to CSIR
-
Acquired from CSIR by Sid Marshall, Marshall Airways, Bankstown Aerodrome NSW
50s
Transported to Bankstown. Stored in Marshall Airways hangar, standing on its undercarriage with outer wings removed
7.3.65
DC-2s A30-9 and VH-CDZ were towed on their wheels behind a truck from Bankstown to Camden Airport where they were stored in a hangar leased by Aerial Agriculture Pty Ltd.
Sid Marshall had agreed to an Aerial Agriculture proposal to use half of his Bankstown hangar for their expanding business, requiring a number of his stored aircraft to be removed from his hangar.
c71
The Camden hangar was no longer available. A30-9 and VH-CDZ were moved to a vacant block in the nearby town Narellen where they were tempirarily parked together exposed to the weather.

VH-CDZ was sold to an American aviation enthusiast and moved from Narellan back to Bankstown Airport for a planned flying restoration. 
c78
A30-9 was moved from Narellan to The Oaks airfield near Camden NSW where Sid Marshall's long-time chief engineer and partner Jack Davidson was storing and selling Marshall aircraft following Sid's death.
The DC-2 was parked at The Oaks on its wheels with outer wings removed.
.82
Reports in British aviation press reported that Aces High Ltd, London planned to restore A30-9 to airworthy for a 50th anniversary commemoration flight London-Melbourne for Dutch National Television.
.82
A30-9 was sold to Jack McDonald DC-2 syndicate, Melbourne.
Jack was an airline pilot with IPEC Essendon and earlier Brain and Brown Airfreighters. He was warbird enthusiast, widely known from his 1960s airshow performances in his Mustang VH-FCB.
The syndicate was formed by McDonald and aircraft engineer James Wright to restore A30-9 to airworthy for the planned 1984 commemoration flight London-Melbourne.
Late 82
Moved by road from The Oaks to Essendon Airport, Melbourne. Significant restoration was carried out in the IPEC hangar at Essendon Airport. Aircraft was complete and painted as silver RAAF "A30-9" by 11.84
c85
The restoration project ceased despiute externally complete. Moved to IPEC hangar at Essendon where stored. Noted in IPEC habgar 2.88
.88
Moved from Essendon to Tyabb Airfield Vic, parked in the open with outer wings removed.
2005
Donated to Australian National Aviation Museum, Moorabbin Airport Vic

Displayed at museum while under restoration, painted as "KLM PH-AJU Uiver"


DC-2s A30-11 VHCRE and A30-9 VHCRK on a patachute training sortie from Richmond
John Hopton Collection


Trainee paratroops with A30-9 at Richmond.                                                    David Vincent collection


Bankstown 7 March 1965: A30-9 removed from Marshall Airways hangar for the road trip to Camden Airport.
Photo by Peter Limon


A30-9 stored at Narellan NSW after it and VH-CDZ were evicted from their hangar at nearby Camden.
Photo circa 1975 by John Hopton


A30-9 at Essendon November 1984 after restoration by Jack McDonald's group. Sadly it was not to fly again.
Photo by Geoff Goodall


            DC-2                  A30-10, "VHCRD"
.35
Built by Douglas Aircraft Co Inc at Santa Monica, California. Model DC-2-171 c/n 1372
11.35
Registered NC14969 Eastern Air Lines Inc, New York NY
15.11.35
Delivery date

Sold to Australian Government, shipped to Australia
3.41
Assembled by Australian National Airways at Essendon Aerodrome, Melbourne
17.3.41
Brought on RAAF charge as A30-10. Received No.1 Aircraft Depot Laverton ex ANA Essendon
21.4.41
Issued to No.1 Wireless Air Gunner School, Ballarat ex 1AD to repoace A30-7
21.1.42
Pilot log: Essendon-Ballarat-Essendon, P/O Peter J.Gibbes, F/O P.C.Burdue
28.1.42
Issued to ANA Essendon for conversion to transport aircraft.
(This included installing a wide cargo door in the rear fuselage and a quick-assembly mobile crane for lifting heavy items like aircraft engines.)
23.3.42
Received 1AD ex ANA, issue to Northern Area same day. Collected at Essendon by F/Lt Horrie Beeston and W/O Alan Randall during their posting from 1WAGS to No.2 Communivcats Flight, Mascot.

For the next 5 weeks Beeston and Randall flew extensive freight operations, carrying aircraft engines, Hudson long range fuel tanks, radio equipment, glycol stocks. Evacuated RAAF personnel from Broome WA following the Japanese air raid there earlier in the month. Carried freshly killed beef from Nookenbah Station to Port Hedland to feed the troops stationed there.
Carried supplies from Melbourne to Daly Waters. At Daly Waters loaded Hudson spare parts (two engines, undercarriage and outer wing section) for a damaged Hudson grounded at Drysdale River Mission WA. Landed there after dark to avoid Japanese recce aircraftand departed at 4am carrying the damaged Hudson engines to Laverton.
9.4.42
Departed Port Pirie for Laverton
13.4.42
Received 1AD Laverton ex Pearce
28.4.42
Allotted No.36 Squadron ex 1AD . To take up transport duties in North West Area.
1.5.42
Departed Port Pirie for Laverton
6.5.42
After delivering stores to Daly Waters, aircraft to return to Alice Springs to load two engines for Hudson A16-208 and carry them to Daly Waters
26.5.42
Now with 36 Squadron based Laverton operating to North West Area
5.42
Directorate of Air Transport Allied Air Forces issued radio callsign VHCRD which was painted on the aircraft
13.6.42
Departed Mildura for Daly Waters
18.6.42
At Laverton being serviced
23.6.42
enroute Batchelor to Laverton
24.6.42
Nhill-Laverton
6.42
36 Squadron DC-2s A30-10 & A30-13 were flying shuttles from Daly Waters to Batchelor carrying 300lb bombs for USAAF B-17s bombing Japanese airfields in Sulewesi and Timor. The DC-2s carried 8 bombs tied to lugs on cabin floor each flight, the detonators stowed in the cockpit. 5 return flights each day.
7.42
36 Squadron relocated from RAAF Laverton to RAAF Essendon. Major overhauls and engine changes contracted to ANA Essendon.
14.11.42
A30-10 departed Essendon for Townsville carrying a ton and a half of freight, flown by F/O J.L.D."Wac" Whiteman and P/O Frank.J.Ball. Arrived Townsville the following day
17.11.42
Townsville-Cooktown-Iron Range-Horn Island carrying supplies to an American unit at Red Island Point, returning to Townsville 20.11.42.  Same crew
21.11.42
Departed Townsville for Rockhampton-Archerfield-Mascot-Essendon. Same crew. Acid had been spilt on the cabin floor and down into the airframe and control cables. Both engines were performing badly and were close to maximum time before overhaul. Whiteman refused to load cargo due to the aircraft's poor condition. ANA checked the engines at Archerfield and Whiteman had made 5 test flights, but engines continued to run roughly, so Whiteman followed the coastline for the rest of the flight to allow for engine failure.
Overnight at Mascot where ANA did further work on the engines.
23.11.42
Late departure Mascot for Essendon due engine work, same crew. Flight planned coastal due the engines  and poor weather on the direct inland route. Approaching Mallacoota in poor weather and the engines still running roughly, Whiteman landed for the night.
24.11.42
Departed Mallacoota for Essendon but returned due rough running engines and bad weather enroute.
Whiteman was ordered to proceed to Essendon
24.11.42
Crashed on takeoff Mallacoota Vic.
Pilot F/O J.L.D.Whiteman, P/O F.J.Ball and four airmen all injured.
Port engine ran rough as the aircraft became airborne then burst into flames. Unable to climb over tall timber ahead Whiteman made a hard turn digging the port wing into the ground, the aircraft skidded on its belly and coming to a stop facing back down the runway.

(For a detailed description of this event and its aftermath see the book There And Back by Allan Randall)
6.1.43
Issued to ANA Essendon
10.2.43
Received 1AD ex ANA for conversion to components
12.8.43
Allotted to Royal Australian Engineers Training Centre, Wagga NSW as a training aid


DC-2 A30-10 with callsign VHCRD on rear fuselage sides.               John Hopton Collection


A30-10 wrecked at Mallacoota Victoria 24 November 1942


            DC-2                  A30-11, "VHCRE"
.34
Built by Douglas Aircraft Co Inc at Santa Monica, California. Model DC-2-112 c/n 1286
11.34
Registered NC13736 Eastern Air Lines Inc, New York NY

Sold to Australian Government, shipped to Australia

Assembled by Australian National Airways at Essendon Aerodrome, Melbourne
30.3.41
Brought on RAAF charge as A30-11. Received No.1 Aircraft Depot Laverton ex ANA Essendon
24.4.41
Issued to No.1 Service Flying Training School Signals School, Point Cook ex 1AD
30.1.42
Received No.1 Wireless Air Gunner School, Ballarat ex 1SFTS
9.2.42
Received 1SFTS Signals School Point Cook ex 1WAGS
5.4.42
Received 1AD Laverton ex 1SFTS for overhaul
13.4.42
Received No.36 Squadron Laverton ex 1AD.  Squadron code "RE-B"
24.4.42
Issued to ANA Essendon for conversion to transport aircraft.
(This included installing a wide cargo door in the rear fuselage and a quick-assembly mobile crane for lifting heavy items like aircraft engines.)
8.6.42
Allotted 36 Sqn ex ANA
6.42
Directorate of Air Transport Allied Air Forces issued radio callsign VHCRE which was painted on the aircraft
13.6.42
Aircraft at Richmond
17.6.42
Enroute Batchelor-Laverton
26.6.42
To proceed immediately to North West Area. To load P&W SC3G engines at 5AD Wagga for Pearce
4.7.42
Enroute to Perth
7.42
A30-11 crewed by pilots F/O Doug Barker and W/O Alan Randall, wireless operator Sgt Maloney and fitter Ernie Flack departed Laverton for Archerfield via overnight stop Canberra. Carried personnel to Richmond. Then 4 return trips Bankstown-Batchelor via refuelling stops at Narromine, Charleville, Cloncurry and Daly Waters each direction, delivering the components of a complete radar station to be erected at Melville Island.
Stranded at Daly Waters for 9 days when an engine failure required a replacement to be flown in.
7.42
36 Squadron relocated from RAAF Laverton to RAAF Essendon. Major overhauls and engine changes contracted to ANA Essendon and Ansett Airways Essedon.
18.11.42
Minor taxying damage, struck a stationary B-25 Mitchell
11.42
36 Squadron relocated from Essendon to Townsville. A30-11 remained at Essendon with a small rear echelon to complete tasks
20.12.42
A30-11 at Essendon commenced a two month operation to transport aircraft engines to the Darwin area after overhaul by RAAF workshops at Tocumwal, Wagga and Richmond.  On the return flight u/s engines were brought back for overhaul. Two 36 Sqn crews were allocated, under Captains F/O Lionel Van Praag and W/O Alan Randall. Operation completed 7.2.43. Randall's crew had flown 183 hours.
6.43
36 Squadron's three remaining DC-2s had been replaced by C-47s on most transport duties. A squadron detachment was established at RAAF Richmondto operate the DC-2s for the Parachute Training Unit based there while still being available to 36 Squadron as required. This continued well into 1944.
26.4.44
Received ANA Essendon ex 36 Sqn for rigging check and maintenance
13.6.44
Received 7AD Tocumwal ex ANA Essendon for maintenance.
18.7.44
Received ANA Parafield ex 7AD for completion of work.
2.12.44
Received 34 Squadron, Parafield ex ANA Parafield. 34 Sqn had transport detachments at Townsville Qld and Coomalie Creek NT.
2.3.45
Issued to 37 Squadron, Essendon ex 34 Sqn. Now all metallic finish with VHCRE on tail in black
2.3.45
Substantial damage forced landing at Parafield due port engine failure. 
Departing on ferry flight to 37 Sqn.  Damage to fuselage, starboard wing and undercarriage.
Flt Lt W. O. Thomas (37 Sqn), 3 crew and 12 passengers unhurt.
5.3.45
Allotted No.5 Central Recovery Depot, Port Pirie. Not collected
10.8.45
Recommended for disposal by Commonwealth Disposals Commission
15.11.45
Minister for Air approved free issue of A30-9, -12 & -14 to Department of Civil Aviation for use by civil airlines
16.1.46
Free issue declined by DCA. The Department did not want DC-2s returning to post-war regular public transport  passenger operations when large stocks of disposals C-47s were becoming available.
A30-11 to be offered to Commonwealth Disposals Commission
14.8.46
Commonwealth Disposals Commission aircraft tender list issued. These regular lists invited tenders for aircraft, engines and equipment. This document included Catalinas, Walrus, Seagull, DC-2s, Percival Q6, Stinson Reliant and engines. The DC-2s were quoted as:
- A30-12 held by 37 Squadron, Essendon: very poor condition, with engines
- A30-11 held by Care & Maintenance Unit, Port Pirie but actually located at Parafield. Airframe only.
- 9 spare Wright Cyclone GR-1820-F2B engines and a considerable listing of spares for the engine type
3.10.46
A30-11 airframe only sold by Commonwealth Disposals Commission for 52 to Marshall Airways,
Mascot Aerodrome, Sydney NSW
27.11.46
Collected by purchaser
11.46
Sid Marshall, founder of Marshall Airways arranged for A30-11 to be moved to a farm close to Parafield aerodrome on the access road close to Main North Road.  He had purchased A30-11 as a parts source only, to provide components for the other RAAF DC-2s he had acquired for a planned NSW internal airline that never eventuated.
3.7.51
Parafield Aerodrome report by John M. Smith: "First aircraft sighted was on the road leading into the aerodrome, in a paddock just off the airfield boundary was Douglas DC-2 A30-11. It was standing on its undercarriage but outer wings removed. It was overall metallic, and carried the radio callsign VHCRE on the tail. Still discernable over the windows was the legend "The Great Silver Fleet" from its days with Eastern Airlines in USA."
Late 54
Sid Marshall and his chief engineer Jack Davidson drove from Sydney to Adelaide in Sid's Chevrolet truck to collect A30-11.  They rigged the airframe to be towed backwards on its own wheels and towed the fuselage back to Bankstown.
Meanwhile Sid had learned from Charles M. McDonald (who had operated in 1947 as Macair Charter Service, Sydney with a DC-2 and C-39 VH-ARC on migrant charters to Europe) that he had a DC-2 mainplane centre-section stored in Adelaide. McDonald had purchased it from Commonwealth Disposals Commission and left it in Adelaide. Sid purchased this centre-section with the plan to eventually use it to replace the accident-damaged centre-section of A30-11.

Sid and Jack returned to Adelaide in the Chevrolet truck to collect A30-11's two wings from the farm and the spare centre-section.  While driving out of Adelaide up the long incline of Glen Osmond Road, the load proved too heavy for the truck. Sid arranged with a Mobil petrol station on the road to allow him to unload the DC-2 centre-section and leave it at the rear of the garage workshop. There it remained for the next 12 years. Despite Sid paying a storage fee for many years, during 1966 the garage proprietor sold it as scrap metal and sent Sid a letter afterwards. Marshall was very annoyed because the centre section had the full undercarriage mechanism and fittings.

A30-11 was left dismantled in the open weather in the Marshall Airways storage compound on the boundary at Bankstown Airport. Other Marshall Airways aircraft in the compound in the 1960s were two other DC-2s, retired Avro Ansons, a Spitfire and Nakajima Oscar, also a Sydney double-decker bus.
17.3.65
Marshall Airways DC-2s VH-CDZ and A30-9 were removed from the Bankstown hangar and moved to a hangar at Camden as part of Sid Marshall leasing half of his hangar to Aerial Agriculture Pty Ltd. Seen during the hangar clean-out was the fuselage of Widgeon VH-UGI and tail fin of A30-11 marked "VHCRE" with US registration NC13736 discernable etched in the metal.
.79
A30-11 was acquired from Sid Marshall's Estate by Rotary Club of West Albury.
The Club planned a memorial to the city's role in helping KLM's PH-AJU during the 1934 London-Melbourne Air Race, when it made a forced landing at night on Albury Racecours on the final leg into Melbourne.
31.8.79
Moved by road from Sydney to Albury. Restored in a hangar at Albury Airport and painted as
"KLM PH-AJU Uiver".
28.1.80
The memorial at Albury Airport was unveiled with the DC-2 mounted on poles.
29.8.02
DC-2 removed from the pole display in a 6 hour operation, lifted over airport fence and parked on its undercarriage near hangars, pending a decision on its future. The Airport Manager stated that reason was airframe corrosion concerns could make the memorial unsafe. An airport engineering firm would make an assessment of repairs needed. The Dutch Government had provided funds for the restoration but council expected the cost to be much higher.

Debate over public funds being used to save the DC-2 became an embarrassment to the Albury Council.
.09
Albury Council offered the DC-2 for disposal. Bids were made by museums and interested parties but the council then bowed to local criticism and decided to retain the aircraft, pending a decision on its fate.

Stored at Albury Airport


36 Squadron A30-11 VHCRE squadron code "RE-B"on a sortie for the Parachute Training Unit Richmond
John Hopton Collection


A30-11's was held dismantled in the Marshall Airways storage yard on the boundary of Bankstown Airport
This and the following photo taken by John Hopton in May 1962.


This rear view shows the Australian cargo door installation which included a personnel door.


Meanwhile A30-11's mainplane centre-section remained at an Adelaide motor garage where it had been unloaded
by Sid Marshall in 1956. Pictured in June 1966, just prior to being sold for scrap metal.   Photo by Geoff Goodall


A30-11 being moved to Albury in August 1979


A30-11 restored to represent PH-AJU "Uiver" at the 1934 Air Race memorial at Albury Airport NSW.
Photo in June 1994 by Geoff Goodall


            DC-2                  A30-12, "VHCRF"
.34
Built by Douglas Aircraft Co Inc at Santa Monica, California. Model DC-2-112 c/n 1257
9.34
Registered NC13731 General Air Lines Inc, New York NY
27.9.34
Delivered to General Air Lines painted in GAL scheme
15.12.34
General Air Lines reformed as Eastern Air Lines Inc, New York NY

Sold to Australian Government, shipped to Australia

Assembled by Australian National Airways at Essendon Aerodrome, Melbourne
31.3.41
Brought on RAAF charge as A30-12. Received No.1 Aircraft Depot Laverton ex ANA Essendon
17.6.41
Issued to No.1 Communications Flight
30.9.41
Cockpit and forward cabin seriously damaged by fire at Archerfield, Brisbane
12.10.41
Issued to Australian National Airways, Archerfield for repair. Progress was slow while waiting for parts from USA and later ANA staff were diverted for maintenance on USAAC aircraft
30.3.42
Delivered to 1AD Laverton ex ANA Archerfield
28.4.42
Allotted No.36 Squadron, Laverton ex 1AD.
4.42
Directorate of Air Transport Allied Air Forces issued radio callsign VHCRF which was painted on the aircraft 
9.42
Damaged at Iron Range airfield, Cape York Qld

A30-12 needs a replacement starboard mainplane and can be assembled on site at Iron Range with the help of the Americans and their equipment
28.9.42
Received No.12 Repair and Salvage Unit, Garbutt ex 36 Squadron for repair. Damaged aircraft moved to 12RSU workshops at RAAF Garbutt
12.10.42
Received 36 Sqn ex 12RSU.  36 Sqn now based at Stock Route Strip, near Townsville.
Squadron code "RE-A", callsign "VHCRF" on tail, name "Silk Merchant" painted under the cockpit
18.10.42
Allotted ANA Essendon ex 36 Sqn. Received back at 36 Sqn 21.10.42
31.10.42
Pilot log: A30-12 Essendon-Wagga-Narromine-Archerfield-Townsville.
Captain W/O Alan Randall, copilot Sgt Langley, W/T operator Sgt Mahoney, fitter LAC Ernie Cobb.
11.42
Replacement mainplanes installed by 12RSU Garbutt
20.11.42
Pilot log:  A30-12 Essendon-Wagga-Narromine-Archerfield-Rockhampton-Townsville.
Captain W/O Alan Randall, copilot F/Lt John Hyde, wireless operator Sgt Dick McKay, fitter ACI Koch. arrived Townsville after dark after flashing code letter of the day to the Magnetic Island gunnery unit by morse code. Flying time 10.5 flyting hours. No accommodation at Townsville so crew slept on aircraft.
21.11.42
Pilot log: A30-12 same crew. Planned Townsville-Essendon but USAAF transport officer gave them orders to proceed to Port Moresbyand had cargo loaded for Cooktown and Iron Range
22.11.42
Pilot log: A30-12 same crew. Iron Range-Horne Island-Port Moresby landed Wards Strip.
23.11.42
Pilot log: A30-12 same crew. Port Moresby-Townsville 4.30am departure: aborted takeoff in dark to avoid a disabled aircraft on edge of runway, damaging port wheel brakes. After repair departed 10.30am, landing at  Cooktown and Cairns enroute. Grounded at Townsville for repairs until 29.11.42
29.11.42
Pilot log: A30-12 same crew: Townsville-Coen-Iron Range-Townsville
30.11.42
Pilot log: A30-12 same crew: Townsville-Jacky Jacky (Higgins Field/Bamaga)-Cairns
1.12.42
Pilot log: A30-12 same crew: Cairns-Townsville
2.12.42
Pilot log: A30-12 same crew: Townsville-Iron Range-Townsville. Landing Townsville in strong crosswind, tail swung violently causing the tailwheel assembly to collapse and minor damage to rear fuselage.
Aircraft grounded Townsville 14 days while repairs carried out.
4.6.43
Received Parachute Training Unit, Richmond ex 36 Sqn
14.7.43
Received 36 Sqn ex PTU.
36 Squadron's three remaining DC-2s had been replaced by C-47s on most transport duties. A squadron detachment was established at RAAF Richmondto operate the DC-2s for the Parachute Training Unit based there while still being available to 36 Squadron as required. This continued well into 1944.
23.4.44
Received PTU Richmond ex 36 Sqn
11.5.44
Ground-loop on takeoff due wind gust, significent damage to airframe
15.5.44
Issued to No.2 Central Recovery Depot, Richmond
20.5.44
Received 2AD Richmond for repair. Airframe flying time 7,903 hours
9.3.45
Received No.37 Squadron, Essendon ex 2AD on completion of rebuild.
37 Sqn operated transport courier services throughout Australia, New Guinea, and to Morotai
10.8.45
Recommended for disposal. Parked at Essendon
15.11.45
Minister for Air approved free issue of A30-9, -11, -12 & -14 to Department of Civil Aviation for use by civil airlines
16.1.46
Free issue declined by DCA. The Department did not want DC-2s returning to regular public transport  passenger operations when large stocks of disposals C-47s were becoming available.
A30-12 to be offered to Commonwealth Disposals Commission
31.7.46
To be transferred to DCA Office in Charge, Essendon Aerodrome pending disposal
14.8.46
Tender document issued by Commonwealth Disposals Commission for sale of Catalinas, Walrus, Seagull, DC-2, Percival Q6, Stinson Reliant and aircraft engines. The two DC-2s were:
- A30-12 held by 37 Squadron, Essendon: very poor condition, with engines
- A30-11 held by Care & Maintenance Unit, Port Pirie but actually located at Parafield. Airframe only. Poor condition. Instruments and electrical equipment sealed and stored for protection
- Nine spare Wright Cyclone GR-1820-F2B engines and a considerable listing of spares for the type
4.10.46
Sold by Commonwealth Disposals Commission for 225 to Marshall Airways. Mascot Aerodrome, Sydney
22.11.46
Issued to purchaser ex DCA Essendon

No further reports found for this aircraft. Assumed broken up at Essendon for engines and parts for Sid Marshall's other RAAF disposals DC-2 purchases.


A30-12 in original metallic finish, date and place not recorded.       Townsville Library via Bob Livingstone


                           Three pictures of A30-12 with Parachute Training Unit, Richmond 1943-1944, 36 Squadron code "RE-A".                                   Photos: John Hopton Collection




Paratroops going out a DC-2 door at Parachute Training Unit, Richmond NSW                  RAAF photo




A30-12 "Silk Merchant" dismantled, probably at Essendon after purchase by Marshall Airways in 1946.
Whether it was moved to Sydney or scrapped at Essendon is not known.                Neil Follett collection


            DC-2                  A30-13, "VHCRG"
.35
Built by Douglas Aircraft Co Inc at Santa Monica, California. Model DC-2-171 c/n 1373
12.35
Registered NC14970 Eastern Air Lines Inc, New York NY
6.12.35
Delivered to Eastern Airlines

Sold to Australian Government, shipped to Australia

Assembled by Australian National Airways at Essendon Aerodrome, Melbourne
27.4.41
Taken in RAAF charge as A30-13. Received 1AD Laverton ex ANA Essendon
27.6.41
Received No.2 Wireless Air Gunners School, Parkes ex 1AD
3.2.42
Departed Richmond carrying wireless equipment to Darwin
11.2.42
Received 1AD ex Darwin for engine change
25.2.42
Issued 2WAGS Parkes ex 1AD
21.3.42
Received 1AD ex Northern Area
31.3.42
Departed Richmond for Daly Waters
13.4.42
Issued ANA Essendon ex 1AD for overhaul
29.4.42
Received No.36 Squadron, Laverton ex ANA Essendon via Daly Waters
4.42
Directorate of Air Transport Allied Air Forces issued radio callsign VHCRG which was painted on the aircraft
17.6.42
Between Laverton and Mareeba on return trip
6.42
36 Squadron DC-2s A30-10 & A30-13 were flying shuttles from Daly Waters to Batchelor carrying 300lb bombs for USAAF B-17s bombing Japanese airfields in Sulewesi and Timor. The DC-2s carried 8 bombs tied to lugs on cabin floor each flight, the detonators stowed in the cockpit. 5 returnflights each day.
27.6.42
A30-13 pilots F/O Doug Barker and W/O Alan Randal, Wireless Operator Don Tremble and Fitter Norm Parker departed Laverton to join the Daly Waters bomb shuttles. Overnighted Alice Springs
29.6.42
A30-13 commenced Daly Waters-Batchelor shuttles, 5 return trips each day carrying bombs. Some flights were delayed due Batchelor air raid warnings.
1.7.42
A30-13 departed Daly Waters to return to Laverton, arrived back 2.7.42
1.8.42
Returning to Archerfield damaged
3.8.42
Issued No.10 Repair and Salvage Unit, Amberley ex 36 Sqn for repairs
4.9.42
Received 36 Sqn, Stock Yard Strip Townsville ex 10RSU
8.1.43
Crashed landing Cooktown Qld.  Pilot attempted a late go-around, stalled, starboard wing contacted the runway, aircraft violently ground-looped off the runway.10 personnel on board minor injuries.
14.1.43
Received No.12 Repair and Salvage Unit, Garbut Field Townsville for salvaging on site
21.4.43
Allotted 1AD Laverton ex 12RSU for assessment of repair required
27.4.43
Shipped on "Bidelia" via Cairns
2.7.43
Allotted to ANA Essendon
10.8.43
Allotted 1AD ex ANA Essendon for conversion to components. Repairable items to be issued to ANA


            DC-2                  A30-14, "VHCRH"
.34
Built by Douglas Aircraft Co Inc at Santa Monica, California. Model DC-2-112 c/n 1288
10.34
Registered NC13738 General Air Lines Inc, New York NY
15.12.34
General Air Lines reformed as Eastern Air Lines Inc, New York NY

Sold to Australian Government, shipped to Australia

Assembled by Australian National Airways at Essendon Aerodrome, Melbourne
1.5.41
Taken on RAAF charge as A30-14.
9.5.41
Received No.1 Aircraft Depot Laverton ex ANA Essendon
25.1.42
Received No.1 Communications Flight, Laverton ex 1AD
5.2.42
To arrive Richmond to carry wireless equipment to Darwin
3.42
Issued No.36 Squadron, Laverton ex 1CF via 1AD
22.3.42
A30-14 was the first aircraft for the newly-formed No.36 (Transport) Squadron which continues to operate in that role today. 36 Sqn commenced operations effective 22.3.42 at Laverton with A30-14 as its only aircraft, personnel of 2 officers and 24 other ranks under CO Ft.Lt W.P.Heath. Initial squadron headquarters were two rooms made out of packing crates next to the Duty Pilots Tower.
A30-9, -10, -12 and -13 were allotted to 36 Sqn over the next two months.
11.4.42
Arrived Oodnadatta SA
18.4.42
Departed Parafield for Laverton

Directorate of Air Transport Allied Air Forces issued radio callsign VHCRH which was painted on the aircraft
13.9.42
Damaged at Cooktown Qld, extensive damage
28.9.42
Received No.12 Repair and Salvage Unit, Charters Towers for damage assessment. Damaged aircraft remained at Cooktown
16.11.42
Crated by 12RSU waiting for shipping to Melbourne to ANA for rebuild
12.1.43
Shipped ex Cooktown by vessel Poonbar for Cairns where will be transferred to ship Ormiston for Sydney
8.2.43
To be shipped on Corio leaving approximately 13 February
13.2.43
Missed Corio, loaded on Liberty Ship J.G.Fields
19.2.43
Forwarded to ANA Essendon for rebuild
9.10.43
On completion of repair by ANA, allotted on temporary loan to Department of Civil Aviation for civil airline use.  To be handed over to DCA at Essendon.
A30-14 to be returned to RAAF when ANA completes repair of A30-6.
13.10.43
Handed over to DCA at Essendon
13.10.43
Operated as radio callsign VHCRH:
Commonwealth of Australia, on loan to Australian National Airways Ltd, Melbourne Vic

Compiler's note: DCA did not issue a Certificate of Registration as VH-CRH. Probably because it was a short-term loan in RAAF configuration to help ANA maintain civil services during a critical aircraft shortage, DCA granted an Authority To Operate, using its military radio callsign VHCRH as identity. However the Department did not follow its normal practice for Australian civil airlines flying military transports of issuing a Special CofA numbered in the "X-" series: refer
http://www.goodall.com.au/australian-aviation/ww2-transport-callsigns-1/ww2transportcallsigns-1.html   
13.10.43
Pilot log: VHCRH MEL-SYD-BNE-SYD-MEL, ANA Captain J. Kemp, FO Charles D. Pratt
18.10.43
Pilot log: VHCRH MEL-SYD-BNE-SYD-MEL, ANA Captain Vern Polly, FO Charlie Pratt
29.10.43
Pilot log: VHCRH MEL-SYD-BNE-SYD-MEL, ANA Captain Alex Bayne, FO Charlie Pratt
2.12.43
Forced landing at Evans Head NSW due fire in starboard engine nacelle caused by a broken fuel line.
Fire was blown out during descent. No additional damage.
Repairs to engine, nacelle and undercarriage carried out at Evans Head, aircraft flown out the same day.
16.2.44
Received No.36 Squadron, Stock Yard Strip, Townsville ex Civil Aviation
23.4.44
Received Parachute Training Unit, Richmond ex 36 Sqn
9.6.44
Airframe total flying time 18,157 hours
14.12.44
Received 2AD Richmond ex PTU for storage pending disposal
15.11.45
Minister for Air approved free issue of A30-9, -11, -12 & -14 to Department of Civil Aviation for use by civil airlines
16.1.46
Free issue declined by DCA. The Department did not want DC-2s returning to regular public transport  passenger operations when large stocks of disposals C-47s were becoming available.
A30-12 to be offered to Commonwealth Disposals Commission
25.7.46
Free issue approved to Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, Sydney. Packing and transport to be charged to CSIR.
.46
Free issue to CSIR cancelled
20.1.47
Sold through Commonwealth Disposals Commission for 250 to Marshall Airways, Kingsford Smith Aerodrome, Mascot, Sydney
25.2.47
Issued to purchaser
47
Moved by road from Richmond to Mascot where stored at Marshall Airways hangar in RAAF camouflage, outer wings removed
c50
Marshall Airways relocated to Bankstown Aerodrome, Sydney. A30-14 was moved by road to Bankstown and stored with outer wings removed at the Marshall Airways hangar
c60
A30-14 was moved with other stored Marshall Airways aircraft to a storage yard on the boundary of Bankstown Airport

Sold by S.D.Marshall Estate to Ralph Cusack, Hendra, Brisbane Qld
.88
Resold to Dutch Dakota Association
11.88
Fuselage left Sydney for Netherlands on board Royal Netherlands Navy vessel HMS Zuiderkruis which  had been part of a four ship goodwill visit to Australia for the Australian Bicentenary celebrations.
12.88
Fuselage unloaded at Den Helder and moved to Amsterdam-Schiphol Airport.
Wings and other sections of the DC-2 followed in shipping containers.
16
Stored dismantled in a hangar at Aviodrome Museum, Lelystad, Netherlands. Still in RAAF camouflage
.16
Transported to Eindhoven-Welschap for further storage
11.5.18
Transported by road to Netherlands Transport Museum, Nieuw-Vennep near Amsterdam Airport.
The faded RAAF camouflage was stripped, aircraft reassembled and retored for display to represent KNILM DC-2 PK-AFK.


A30-14 at RAAF Nhill Vic in 1942                                                        Kevin O'Reilly collection


A30-14 VHCRH damaged at Cooktown Qld in September 1942, dismantled awaiting collection.
Note the repainted roundel.                        National Library of Australia E.A.Crome collection


Essendon 1943 now with Pacific Theatre blue & white roundels.                         Neil Follett collection


Three views in Sid Marshall's storage yard Bankstown Airport, Sydney taken in February 1964 by John Hopton


Wartime name ME MATE is visible below the cockpit


One of Sid Marshall's ex RAAF Spitfires and the wing of his Nakajima Oscar can be seen in this view .


A30-14 in storage at Lelystad, Netherlands in December 2005.    Photo Sander Raaphorst via Fred Niven

Paint stripping of the rear fuselage at Lelystad confirms the identity.    Photo Willem Honders  via Fred Niven

4.  Dutch KNILM DC-2s evacuated from Netherlands East Indies

Koninklijke Nederlandsch-Indische Luchtvaart Maatschappij - KNILM operated pre-WWII from Batavia NEI (now Jakarta, Indonesia).
KNILM was an independent airline, not a subsidiary of KLM as is often assumed. It did however have close operational links with KLM, scheduling its services to NEI ports to connect with the KLM Amsterdam-Batavia long-distance route.

In early 1936 the Netherlands Government had requested Australian Government approval for KNILM to operate Batavia-Sydney, but response was slow, mired in British Empire politics sought to protect the existing Imperial Airways-Qantas Empire Airways service London-Singapore-Batavia-Brisbane. In January 1937 KNILM senior personnel took advantage of an unexpected DC-2 charter flight to Sydney to travel on the aircraft to Sydney to have personal talks with Australian government officials.  Just like the KLM DC-2 in the 1934 MacRobertson Air Race, once again the speed and passenger comfort of the KNILM DC-2 was obvious compared to the Qantas DH.86 biplanes. The new Lockheed Super Electras which KNILM proposed for the Australian route had an even better performance.
Australian Government approval was granted  on 30 April 1937. The inaugural KNILM passenger service Batavia-Sydney was flown by Lockheed 14 PK-AFM which landed at Mascot on 5 July 1938 to commence a weekly schedule.  The Lockheeds on the Australian run were later supplemented with DC-2s and DC-5s: see http://www.goodall.com.au/australian-aviation/dc-5/douglas-dc-5.htm

Japanese invasion of the NEI commenced in the weeks following Pearl Harbor, with landings at Borneo to capture oil production areas. Attacks and landings on the main islands Java and Sumatra continued January-March 1942 until the Dutch Commander surrended on 9 March 1942.  US navy and air force units evacuated during the fall of the Philippines supported the NEI military but soon fell back against the enemy advances.  As the situation became hopeless during February and March 1942 many Dutch military aircraft and civil airliners made evacuation flights to Australia, most carrying civilian refugees. Many acts of heroism took place during these desperate flights with minimal navigation facilities and some in damaged aircraft. Refer:
http://www.goodall.com.au/australian-aviation/dornier-24/dornierDo24.html
http://www.goodall.com.au/australian-aviation/ww2-transport-callsigns-1/ww2transportcallsigns-1.html

Eleven KNILM airliners reached Australia. Three Lockheed 14s, three DC-5s, two DC-2s and three DC-3s although one DC-3 PK-AFV was attacked by Japanese fighters as it approached Broome, Western Australia on 3 March 1942 and made a forced landing on a beach.
In Australia the KNILM aircraft joined the Allied war effort, flying troops and supplies to the Darwin area and New Guinea.
Details on the two Dutch DC-2s:

             DC-2                   PK-AFK, (41-1375), "VHCXF"
.35
Built by Douglas Aircraft Co Inc at Santa Monica, California. Model DC-2-115G,  c/n 1375

Built to the order of Koninklijke Nederlandsch-Indische Luchtvaart Maatschappij - KNILM, Batavia, Netherlands East Indies. (Royal Dutch Indies Airways)
12.6.35
Douglas delivery date to KNILM
6.35
Registered PK-AFK KNILM, Batavia
3.42
Evacuated to Australia ahead of the Japanese advance through Netherlands East Indies

Flown in Australia by KNILM pilots on ad-hoc transport sorties in support the Allied war effort
3.42
Australian Government documents indicate that all KNILM aircraft in Australia were to be transferred to the Australian Government for a token 5 each. They were planned to supplement Australian airlines, which had lost many of their aircraft due to RAAF impressments. However General Douglas Macarthur, Supreme Commander SWPA ordered the Dutch airliners to be transferred to USAAF in Australia for military transport duties.
19.3.42
Taken over by USAAF Air Transport Command, South West Pacific Area in a charter arrangement pending their purchase. Flown by Dutch crews carrying US cargo and personnel in Australia

Allocated temporary USAAF serial "41-1375".  This was a temporary identity applied to Dutch transport aircraft taken over by USAAF in Australia during this period, Fiscal Year 41- + aircraft c/n
15.5.42
PK-AFK purchased by USAAF Air Transport Command, South West Pacific Area
15.5.42
Directorate of Air Transport, Allied Air Forces (DAT) was formally established to manage military transport aircraft operations in Australia by RAAF, USAAF and Australian civil airlines flying leased military aircraft (Qantas, ANA, Guinea Airways).

DAT allocated radio callsign VHCXF.  The first group of transport aircraft were given callsigns in the VH-CX and VH-CA blocks, which were painted in white on the camouflaged aircraft.

Operated by 21 Troop Carrier Squadron, 374 Troop Carrier Group, USAAF 5th Air Force: based at Archerfield Aerodrome, Brisbane. Operated a courier service Brisbane-Port Moresby carrying troops to New Guinea and some supplies. Only small items of cargo could be carried because of the lack of cargo door.
23.6.42
crashed at Charters Towers, Queensland
29.7.42
DAT daily aircraft status list shows CXF at Charters Towers "disassembled"
14.6.44
USAAF book-keeping exercise to cover the acquisition of the Dutch aircraft in Australia in 1942:
Approval of Purchase Order No.44068, from Netherlands, under Order AC6838: allotment of USAAF type designation and serial number:  C-32A serial 44-83226.


Newspaper picture of new DC-2s PK-AFJ and PK-AFK being loaded on a Batavia-bound ship at the
Long Beach docks, California in 1935.                                               Fred Niven collection


PK-AFK on a prewar KNILM service in Netherlands East Indies


              DC-2                   PK-AFL, (41-1376), VHCXG, VH-ADZ Mengana, VH-CDZ     

Built by Douglas Aircraft Co Inc at Santa Monica, California. Model DC-2-115G,  c/n 1376

Built to the order of Koninklijke Nederlandsch-Indische Luchtvaart Maatschappij - KNILM, Batavia, Netherlands East Indies. (Royal Dutch Indies Airways)
12.6.35
Douglas delivery date to KNILM

Registered PK-AFL: KNILM, Batavia
9.1.37
PK-AFL departed Batavia on a special flight to Australia. The aircraft had been chartered by Sir Laurence Philipps, Chairman of British United Steamship Company to carry his family group to Australia when seats were unavailable on the Qantas DH.86 service.
KNILM Flying Superintendent Major Willem Carol Jahan Versteegh also travelled on the DC-2 to have discussions with the Australian Government over KNILM's application for a Batavia-Sydney service. The flight was under the command of KNILM Captain J.J.Schott with three crew. 
PK-AFL reached Sydney 12.1.37 and returned to Batavia 18.1.37
3.42
Evacuated to Australia ahead of the Japanese advance through Netherlands East Indies

Flown in Australia by KNILM pilots on ad-hoc transport sorties in support the Allied war effort
3.42
Australian Government documents indicate that all KNILM aircraft in Australia were to be transferred to the Australian Government for a token 5 each. They were planned to supplement Australian airlines, which had lost many of their aircraft due to RAAF impressments. However General Douglas Macarthur, Supreme Commander SWPA ordered the Dutch airliners to be transferred to USAAF in Australia for military transport duties.
19.3.42
Taken over by USAAF Air Transport Command, South West Pacific Area in a charter arrangement pending their purchase. Flown by Dutch crews carrying US cargo and personnel in Australia

Allocated temporary USAAF serial "41-1376".  This was a temporary identity applied to Dutch transport aircraft taken over by USAAF in Australia during this period, Fiscal Year 41- + aircraft c/n
15.5.42
PK-AFL purchased by USAAF Air Transport Command, South West Pacific Area
15.5.42
Directorate of Air Transport, Allied Air Forces (DAT) was formally established to manage military transport aircraft operations in Australia by RAAF, USAAF and Australian civil airlines flying leased military aircraft (Qantas, ANA, Guinea Airways).

DAT allocated radio callsign VHCXG.  The first group of transport aircraft were given callsigns in the VH-CX and VH-CA blocks, which were painted in white on the camouflaged aircraft.

Operated by 21 Troop Carrier Squadron, 374 Troop Carrier Group, USAAF 5th Air Force: based at Archerfield Aerodrome, Brisbane. Operated a courier service Brisbane-Port Moresby carrying troops to New Guinea and some supplies. Only small items of cargo could be carried because of the lack of cargo door.
29.7.42
DAT daily aircraft status list shows DC-2 CXF (identity AFL) enroute Archerfield to Mascot 
17.8.42
VHCXG reportedly damaged on ground at Seven Mile Drome, Port Moresby by Japanese bombing raid
22.9.42
VHCXG reportedly damaged in accident at Cooktown Qld. 
Repaired by 5th Air Force 61st Service Squadron
(At that time Cooktown was regularly used by military transport aircraft as a refuelling stop between New Guinea and Townsville)
10.43
Australian National Airways, Melbourne advised the Department of Civil Aviation that it would not be able to maintain reduced wartime civilian services without replacement aircraft to cover their fleet losses due to the war situation. DCA Head Office and ADAT HQ were both situated in Victoria Barracks, Melbourne and the Department negotiated the release of DC-2 VHCXG to ANA.
21.10.43
Civil Registration application: Australian National Airways Pty Ltd, Essendon Aerodrome, Melbourne Vic. 
Application states c/n 1376 built at Santa Monica June 1935, flown to Australia by a KNILM crew as PK-AFL.

Overhaul by ANA at Essendon to convert to civilian airliner standard
27.1.44
Registered VH-ADZ: Commonwealth of Australia operated under charter by Australian National Airways Pty Ltd, Melbourne Vic. Named Mengana
27.1.44
Australian CofA issued at Essendon, fitted for 15 passengers
1.44
Entered ANA passenger service
5.44
Damaged at Mildura Vic, repaired
14.6.44
USAAF book-keeping exercise to cover the acquisition of the Dutch aircraft in Australia in 1942:
Approval of Purchase Order No.44068, from Netherlands, under Order AC6838: allotment of USAAF type designation and serial number:  C-32A serial 44-83227.
10.44
Several DCA incident reports from Parafield Aeradio due loss of radio comms while operating Melbourne-Adelaide and Melbourne-Perth services
20.8.45
Minor damage struck by a bullet fired from the ground near Narrandera NSW while at low altitude for a scheduled stop on a Wagga-Narrandera-Adelaide service.
6.47
VH-ADZ is operating ANA's Adelaide-Ceduna-Forrest-Kalgoorlie-Perth return services
5.11.47
Change of ownership: Colonel Charles Morrison McDonald, Sydney trading as Macair Charter Service

Charles McDonald had formed Macair Charter Service during 1947 to join other Australian air charter operators on the lucrative migrant trade, flying European migrants, many displaced by the war to Australia.  Postwar demands on shipping had caused long delays for sea travel and existing airline services had limited seating: see http://www.goodall.com.au/migrant-caper.htm

Macair Charter Service was basd at Bankstown Aerodrome, Sydney at the Curtis Madsen Aircafts hangar. Chief pilot was Captain Alan Murray. The company was to operate for less than six months. McDonald also purchased ANA Douglas C-39s VH-ARB and ARC: see Part 5 below
18.1.48
VH-ADZ arrived Mascot Aerodrome, Sydney from Rome on Macair Charter Service's first migrant charter, with 15 passengers. Captain A.J.Brooks reported an "uncomfortable" delay in Calcutta, India while having a mechanical problem corrected during the inbound flight to Australia.

Sydney Morning Herald newspaper  17.3.48 report on the migrant air charters stated “Macair Charter Service claimed its Douglas DC-2 had been sabotaged when starting to operate its first migration flight; the aircraft had made a forced landing at Darwin.”    
6.48
DCA Mascot offcice memo: McDonald was in debt to Arthur Carveles, a Sydney travel agent who booked migrants in Rome and Athens for flights to Australia. Carveles took legal action to gain ownership of Macair aircraft DC-2 VH-ADZ and C-39 VH-ARC to resell.
6.48
Change of ownership: Arthur Carveles trading as International Rapid Air Services, Kings Cross, Sydney
8.7.48
Change of ownership: Sidney D. Marshall trading as Marshall Airways, Mascot Aerodrome, Sydney

Sid Marshall established Marshall Airways at Mascot prewar as a maintenance and charter business, specialising in air ambulance flights.  After the war Sid had intentions of starting an intra-state NSW airline and purchased four RAAF disposals DC-2s see Part 3 above.
48
Ongoing correspondence between Sid Marshall and DCA concerning his plans to use DC-2s on scheduled airline passenger services. The DCA reponses were not encouraging, pointing out that most NSW country town aerodromes were below standards for a DC-2 and that the Director General was not issuing any new airline licences at that stage. Departmental internal memos dismissed the use of DC-2s on RPT operations due to the type's age. Marshall was respected by Dept officers, who delayed a clear refusal, hoping he would drop the RPT idea.
VH-CDZ instead was used for a variety of passenger charters, including weekend joyrides.
24.8.49
Reregistered VH-CDZ.  DCA had required changes to numerous civil registration letters to avoid conflict with new International codes to become standard worldwide in radio telephony and teleprinter messages. VH-ADZ was no longer available because "ADZ" meant "Advise"in aircraft movement messages.
.50
Marshall Airways relocated from Mascot to Bankstown Aerodrome where DCA leased two former RAAF Bellman hangars to the company.
(All Mascot light aircraft operators including Royal Aero Club of NSW were required by DCA to vacate their premises by 1951 to allow Mascot airport development to handle increasing airline traffic.)
29.12.57
Port undercarriage collapsed at Mascot Aerodrome. The aircaft had stopped on a taxiway because of a flat tyre and was being towed clear.  The tug pulled the DC-2 in a tight turn which damaged the port undercarriage assembly which then collapsed. The port wing settled on the ground and the airframe suffered minor  structural damage. Marshall Airways Chief Engineer Jack Davidson fitted the port wing from A30-9 which was in storage at Bankstown Aerodrome.
14.2.58
Ferried Mascot-Bankstown by Sid Marshall and Trevor Thiele
2.58
Retired at Bankstown. Airframe time 9,649 hours.
Permanent repairs were not carried out because DCA aerodrome restrictions had by now reduced the NSW airfields to which the DC-2 could fly charters.
58-65
VH-CDZ and RAAF DC-2s A30-9 and A30-14 were stored in or outside the Marshall Airways hangars.
The dismantled DC-2 A30-11 was with other Marshall aircraft in a compound on the airfield boundary. 
7.3.65
A30-9 and VH-CDZ removed from Marshall's second hangar and towed on their wheels by the Marshall Airways truck from Bankstown to Camden Airport, south of Sydney.
Sid Marshall had leased the second hangar to his neighbour Aerial Agriculture Pty Ltd which need more hangarage. In return Marshall was given use of a Camden hangar leased by Aerial Agriculture.
c71
The Camden hangar lease ended. VH-CDZ and A30-9 were moved to a block of land in the nearby town of Narellan. Parked in the open with outer wings removed.
.72
Sold to Maurice J. Whittington, trading as Hendon Aeroplane Company, Sydney NSW.
Whittington was a vintage aircraft dealer who had previously traded under the name Stag Lane Flight.
Whittington also acquired Marshall aircraft DH.80 Puss Moth VH-UQB and Short Scion VH-UUP, which were sold to a British collector.
.72
VH-CDZ resold to US citizen Captain Richard M. Rosser, Confederate Air Force, Harlingen Texas     
4.6.72
Towed from Narellan back to Bankstown Airport. Rosser was reported as planning to have Hawker De Havilland at Bankstown overhaul the aircraft for issue of a United States FAA Certificate of Airworthiness. He would then fly the DC-2 to USA.

VH-CDZ was mostly parked outside at Bankstown during the rest of the 1970s

10.7.80 letter from Australian Deparment of Transport to The Curator Netherlands National Aerospace Museum, Amsterdam in reply to a query on acquiring VH-CDZ. "The Minister for Home Affairs, who is responsible for preserving the National Heritage has advised that because of the rarity of the DC-2 and its association with early aviation in Australia, no application to export the aircraft should be approved. This Department agrees with that advice so no Authority to Export would be issued."

Compiler's note: one wonders how this ruling can be reconciled against A30-14's export to The Netherlands in 1988.
11.81
Registered N8486D Richard M. Rosser
c83
Acquired by Mike Wansey, Confederate Air Force (Australian Wing), Newcastle NSW
c83
Overhaul to airworthy condition commenced in a hangar at Bankstown,
c85
Reported that the stripped fuselage was standing on its undercarriage when unauthorised visitors entered the cabin. As they moved forward to the cockpit, their weight caused the fuselage to pivot on the undercarriage and the tail rose and struck the hangar roof before falling heavily back to the hangar floor.
Overhaul abandoned due to airframe structural damage.
95
The DC-2 was now reporedly owned by International Air Parts Pty Ltd, Bankstown Airport.
IAP was a parts business which also dealt in military-disposals aircraft on the warbird market

Stored dismantled at Bankstown at the rear of a hangar


PK-AFL heads this lineup at Batavia, with an Imperial Airways DH86, Qantas Empire Airways DH.86 and
another KNILM DC-2 behind. The comparison with the British wood and fabric biplanes is obvious.


KNILM DC-2 PK-AFL attracts a crowd at Archerfield Aerodrome, Brisbane, probably during its
January 1937 charter flight to Australia.                                                     Fred Niven collection


Essendon January 1944 after overhaul by ANA to become VH-ADZ "Mengana".    CofA form photograph


VH-ADZ in ANA service seen at Adelaide-Parafield.                                        Maurice Austin collection


Reregistered VH-CDZ with Marshall Airways, at Bankstown August 1957.                Fred Niven collection


Glorious photograph by Eric Allen of VH-CDZ taxying at Bankstown during the 1950s.


Marshall Airways DC-2s VH-CDZ (front) and A30-9 at Bankstown 7 March 1965 being prepared to be towed
on their main wheels by road to Camden Airport for continued storage.                        Photo by Peter Limon
 

April 1974, VH-CDZ back at Bankstown awaiting overhaul, now owned by an American airline pilot.
Unfortunately the overhaul back to airworthy was never completed.        Photo by Chris O'Neill


VH-CDZ at Bankstown January 1989 after work on the overhaul stopped.          Photo by Dion Makowski


VH-CDZ stored at Bankstown by August 2008.                                                Photo by Brenden Scott


5.   USAAF C-33s and C-39s in Australia with 5th Air Force SWPA
      In the early days that followed the Japanese entry into World War II in December 1941, a number of USAAF military DC-2 variants were used in Australia by the US 5th Air Force South West Pacific Area.  At least nine C-39s were evacuated from US military airfields in the Philippines ahead of the Japanse invasion, to operate re-supply missions to southern Philippines and US forces in Netherlands East Indies.  When NEI also fell to the Japanese, the surviving USAAF  transport aircraft regrouped in Australia as the first aircrafty of the 5th Air Force Air Transport Command formed in January 1942 at RAAF Amberley, south of Brisbane. They provided vital military transport roles for the first year of the Pacific Theatre before being replaced by deliveries of the far superior Douglas C-47 range.
      Two C-33s and at least nine C-39s were operated in Australia.
Douglas C-33: DC-2 with cargo door, reinforced floor, enlarged DC-3 design fin and rudder. 750hp Wright R-1820-25s
Douglas C-39: C-33 fuselage and wings, DC-3 centre-section, undercarriage and tail unit.       975hp Wright R-1820-55s

     Three C-39s were loaned to Australian National Airways in 1943, when the type was often referred to as the DC-2 and a Half.
Two of the ANA C-39s went on to post-war civil use with Guinea Air Traders in New Guinea.

            Douglas C-33    36-77 "VHCBF"
.36
Built by Douglas Aircraft Co Inc at Santa Monica, California, c/n 1510

US Army Air Corps order for 18 C-33s, military cargo version of DC-2 with enlarged tailplane, reinforced floor and 1.6 metre (5 ft 9 inches) wide cargo loading door on port side.
22.10.36
Accepted by USAAC as C-33 36-77
8.2.37
Assigned Hickam Army Airfield, Honolulu
25.10.42
Assigned New Caledonia

Operated a military courier service between Noumea, New Caledonia and Brisbane

Directorate of Air Transport Allied Air Forces issued radio callsign VHCBF which was painted over the camouflage on the aircraft
12.43
Crashed Tontouta Field, Noumea
13.12.43
Stricken from USAAF strength


            Douglas C-33    36-83 "VHCBG"
.36
Built by Douglas Aircraft Co Inc at Santa Monica, California, c/n 1516

US Army Air Corps order for 18 C-33s, military cargo version of DC-2 with enlarged tailplane, reinforced floor and 1.6 metre (5 ft 9 inches) wide cargo loading door on port side.
30.11.36
Accepted by USAAC as C-33 36-83
.37
Assigned Langly Army Airfield, Virginia
6.40
Assigned Patterson AAF, Dayton Ohio.
-
Assigned New Caledonia
42
Operated a military courier service between Noumea, New Caledonia and Brisbane

Directorate of Air Transport Allied Air Forces issued radio callsign VHCBG which was painted over the camouflage on the aircraft
31.3.42
Stricken from USAAF strength.


        Douglas C-39     38-501 "VHCDZ"
2.39
Completed by Douglas Aircraft Co Inc at Santa Monica, California, c/n 2059

Built to USAAC order as a C-39-DO serial 38-501 Wright  R-1820-55 Cyclone engines
2.3.39
Delivered to USAAC as 38-501.

Assigned transport radio callsign VHCDZ
2.44
Stricken from USAAF strength 


          Douglas C-39     38-505 "VHCCA"  Anne
3.39
Completed by Douglas Aircraft Co Inc at Santa Monica, California, c/n 2062

Built to USAAC order as a C-39-DO serial 38-505. Wright  R-1820-55 Cyclone engines
15.5.39
Delivered to USAAC as 38-505.
5.8.41
Assigned Nichols Field, Manila, Philippines
19.12.41
Departed Nichols Field, Manila with General MacArthur's party evacuated to Australia during the Japanese invasion of Philippines. Arrived Darwin 22.12.41

Assigned transport radio callsign VHCCA.  Named Anne
25.5.42
Crashed after takoff, destroyed, Alice Springs NT

Due to poor weather conditions, the captain had delayed departure for more than three hours. Carrying cargo of tracer ammunition urgently needed in Darwin by RAAF.  Immediately after the night take off, the aircraft stalled, crashed and burned in a desert area close to the airfield.  All nine occupants were killed:
Crew (21st Troop Carrier Squadron):
2nd Lt Russell L. Callison
2nd Lt William A. O'Neill
Pvt Martin J. Law
Pvt Rolfe M. Smith
Passengers:
2nd Lt Aubrey Lawless Tobias
F/Lt Duncan Matheson,
LAC James Emmanuel Skillen
Investigation found the total weight of the aircraft was 2,762 pounds above the calculated Maximum Takeoff Weight (MTOW) allowable at the time of the accident.


          Douglas C-39     38-508 "VHCCC"
5.39
Completed by Douglas Aircraft Co Inc at Santa Monica, California, c/n 2065

Built to USAAC order as a C-39-DO serial 38-508. Wright  R-1820-55 Cyclone engines
6.6.39
Delivered to USAAC as 38-508.

Assigned transport radio callsign VHCCC. 

Returned to USA.
6.5.43
Stricken from USAAF strength: "Surveyed" Rome Air Depot, New York


            Douglas C-39    38-519 "VHCCG" Andrea, to VH-ARB
13.7.39
Completed by Douglas Aircraft Co Inc at Santa Monica, California, c/n 2076

Built to USAAC order as a C-39-DO serial 38-519. Wright  R-1820-55 Cyclone engines
18.7.39
Delivered to USAAC as 38-519. Delivered to Selfridge Army Airfield, Michigan
12.2.40
Assigned 5 Transport Squadron, Patterson AAF, Ohio
7.10.40
Assigned Brookley AAF, Alabama
11.12.41
Assigned Mines AAF, Los Angeles California 
11.1.42
Assigned Brookley Field, Alabama
25.2.42
Assigned Mines Field, Los Angeles for packing for shipping
9.3.42
Assigned USAAF 5th Air Force, Australia
9.4.42
Received at Commonwealth Aircraft Corp, Fishermans Bend, Melbourne Vic for assembly
24.4.42
Unpacking and assembly completed at CAC, fitted with 14 passenger seats
25.4.42
Delivered to 5th Air Force in Australia ex CAC. Named Andrea
Operated by USAAF transport units between Australia and New Guinea

Directorate of Air Transport Allied Air Forces issued radio callsign VHCCG which was painted over the camouflage on the aircraft
29.7.42
DAT daily movements list shows C-39 CCG No.519 at Essendon, engine overhaul, ready in a week.
.42
Forced landing Dalby Qld
1.5.43
Assigned 39 Troop Carrier Squadron, 317th Troop Carrier Group, Brisbane
7.43
Loaned to Australian National Airways Pty Ltd, Melbourne to be operated on military transport duties as instructed by Directorate of Air Transport. ANA to  maintain the aircraft and provide an ANA Captain for each military sortie, DAT to provide a RAAF or USAAF copilot.
3.7.43
Australian CofA application: Australian National Airways Pty Ltd owned by US Army Air Forces.
To be operated by ANA under radio callsign VHCCG, no Australian civil registration will be issued.
Application quotes USAAF serial 38-519, c/n 2076, built Santa Monica 13.7.39, Wright G1820-F55s.

3.7.43
DCA give approval for ANA to commence operating VHCCG pending formal issue of CofA.
Fitted for 2 pilots and 15 pasenger seats.
7.7.43
CofA No.X11 issued for VHCCG, in a DCA special series of X-prefix CofAs for military transport aircraft  operated on loan to Australian civil airines under wartime agreements
7.12.43
Port wing struck by USAAF refuelling truck at Archerfield Qld. Repairs completed 15.12.43.
16.12.43
Test flown Archerfield after repair, departed on USAAF charter
8.3.44
ANA pilot log: A. Fache: CCG flown 2 hrs 35 mins
15.3.44
ANA pilot log: A. Fache: CCG flown 2 hrs 20 mins
6.4.44
CofA renewal overhaul completed by ANA at Essednon
20.4.44
DAT letter to ANA advising that C-39 CCG would be replaced by a C-49 and that ANA is requested to retain and store CCG until a decision is made on its future use.
3.5.44
Returned to USAAF by ANA

Correspondence from 5th Air Force Colonel Elsmore to Ivan Holyman, ANA Managing Director advising of the availability of 11 USAAF surplus transport aircraft which had potential for use by civil airlines.

VHCCG resumes being operated by ANA.  (DCA aircraft file has no reference to this)
1.8.44
pilot log: RAAF copilot Dick Bampton, with ANA Captain Browne, and RAAF F/Sgt Freeman:
CCG night courier service Archerfield-Port Moresby "Engine failure 100 miles north Osprey reef at 0410 at 7000 feet. Lost height to 100 feet in 30 minutes. Finished trip at sea level in bad weather conditions."
31.8.44
USAAF "Condemned", ie. Struck-off Charge
11.44
US Foreign Economic Administration correspondence with DCA regarding military aircraft that have been  declared surplus and are available for disposal to Australian airline operating companies on a cash basis.
A total of 12 aircraft are listed: C-39s, ex-Dutch Lodestars, DC-3s and a DC-5.

- includes Douglas C-39 38-519 Located Essendon with ANA, airframe time approximately 4,500 hours. “fly-away condition after pre-flight inspection”
c1.45
Purchased ex US Foreign Liquidation Commission by Australian National Airways Pty Ltd, Melbourne
2.45
DCA memo: CCG at Essedon is now fitted with passenger seating similar to DC-2.  Hostess buffet and lavatory are being installed. No soundproofing or cabin trim.
6.2.45
Official sale date from US Government to ANA Pty Ltd
25.5.45
Australian CofA issued in standard airline category. Operating as callsign VHCCG
2.6.45
Letter from DCA to ANA Chief Engineer Mr. Jack Stubbs, Essendon:
- an inspection of CCG on 1 June 1945 revealed that the conversion to passenger aircraft had been carried out in a very unsatisfactory manner, especially attachment of passenger and hostess seating and structure of a rear baggage locker. Engineering drawings were not submitted to DCA for approval and it is understood they have not yet been drawn, despite the modifications being carried out 3 months ago.
- DCA Senior Inspector Aircraft at Essendon was criticised for renewing the CofA without confirming that the passenger modifications had been submitted and approved.
- before CCG may resume operation for public transport, ANA must supply proof that all modifications are airworthy and approved.
5.6.45
DCA became aware that ANA continued to operate VHCCG on civil scheduled passenger services without complying with DCA ruling it not fly until drawings for passenger modifications were submitted and approved.  DCA suspends the CofA until the matter is resolved. (No file record of how many days)
10.45
VHCCG used on ANA scheduled services Essendon-Mildura-Broken Hill
23.11.45
ANA pilot log Alf Fache: CCG Sydney-Canberra-Essendon-Nhill-Adelaide
10.12.45
ANA pilot log Alf Fache: CCG Adelaide-Essendon-Canberra-Sydney
1.46
DCA file references to incidents while CCG operating ANA services to Tasmania: reports of high engine temperatures and electrical system failures experienced by CCG and CCH.
21.1.46
Press report of first post-war Douglas service from Wynyard direct to Melbbourne, operated by VHCCG under command of ANA Captain R.Way, who had flown it Essendon-Wynyard earlier that day.

DCA terminated wartime arrangements for military transport aircraft operated by Australian airlines and required all aircraft to comply with normal procedures for issue of civil registration and CofA.
6.5.46
Australian Civil Registration application: Australian National Airways Pty Ltd, Melbourne
Application forms for CCG, CCH and DC-5 CXC were submitted to DCA with the same letter from ANA which stated "Import of these aircraft was approved on 20 February 1946."
24.5.46
Added to Australian Civil Register as VH-ARB
29.5.46
DCA Airport Manager Essendon memo to DCA Head Office states that C-39s CCG and CCH are parked with wings removed in the open behind an ANA hangar at Essendon. Wings are stored.
11.46
DCA internal memos discuss what action the Department would take should ANA wish to put their two stored C-39s VH-ARB and ARC into passenger service. DCA does not want DC-2 types in post-war airline use because of poor climb performance. Head Office decides to defer a decision.
7.11.47
DCA approve ANA request to ferry C-39s VH-ARB and VH-ARC from Essendon to Sydney displaying their current markings VHCCG and VHCCH.
17.1.48
Change of ownership: Colonel Charles Morrison McDonald, Sydney trading as Macair Charter Service
2.4.48
ANA letter to DCA stating that the sale of VH-ARB (ex CCG) has fallen through and ANA request to ferry it from Mascot to Essendon. Approved
28.5.48
Change of ownership: Guinea Air Traders, Lae, New Guinea
16.8.48
Letter to DCA from GAT: VH-ARB was recently flown to Darwin "where it is grounded due defects apparently the result of sabotage".
GAT sent C-39 VH-ARC from Sydney to Darwin with two spare engines and two engineers. Both engines were changed and VH-ARB ferried back to Sydney. Since then much maintenance work has been carried out on the aircraft in Curtis Madsen Aircraft's hangar at Bankstown.
7.49
GAT advise DCA that work on VH-ARB is finally due to be completed and it will be ready for test flight at Bankstown on 11.7.49
14.7.49
CofA renewed Bankstown. Weighed on DCA scales at Bankstown and Load Charts prepared, freighter cabin with 4 passenger seats
11.49
GAT write to DCA stating that they now wish to fit seating for 23 native passengers, using USAAF standard Norseman bench seats, as already fitted to their Hudson VH-BLA. DCA approves.
23.12.49
Loss of radio report in New Guinea while on a passenger flight
24.1.50
Letter to DCA from GAT Chief Engineer Tom J.Watson: request VH-ARB payload be increased by 500 lbs for short flights in New Guinea. Freighter floor similar to C-47.

Retired at Lae Aerodrome, New Guinea
13.7.50
CofA expired. Not renewed.

Stripped for parts on side of airfield. Reportedly sold to Mandated Airlines for parts, unconfirmed


C-39 VHCCG at RAAF Wagga NSW for maintenance in early 1942.           Photo Art Houseman


Port Moresby, New Guinea 1942.                                  Photo AWM via Barrie Colledge collection


VHCCG with camouflage removed, loading US personnel while operated by ANA on military courier work.
Photo: David Vincent collection


VHCCG became VH-ARB postwar. seen at Brisbane-Eagle Farm Aerodrome 1948 with Guinea Air Traders.
Photo by Gus Grulke


VH-ARB at Lae, New Guinea. Photo from Guinea Air Traders' founder Sam Jamieson, via James Sinclair


VH-ARB's stripped airframe abandoned at Lae Aerodrome circa 1955.  Photo Richard Leahy, via Paul Howard


         Douglas C-39     38-527 "VHCCD"
7.39
Completed by Douglas Aircraft Co Inc at Santa Monica, California, c/n 2084

Built to USAAC order as a C-39-DO serial 38-527. Wright  R-1820-55 engines
7.8.39
Delivered to USAAC as 38-527

Assigned transport radio callsign VHCCD
19.11.43
Stricken from USAAF strength


           Douglas C-39    38-530 "VHCCF" Gallahad
8.9.39
Built by Douglas Aircraft Co Inc at Santa Monica, California, c/n 2087

Built to USAAC order as a C-39-DO serial 38-530. Wright  R-1820-55 Cyclone engines
18.8.39
Delivered to USAAC as C-39 38-530
19.9.38
Assigned Olmstead Army Airfield, Pennsylvania
8.2.42
Assigned San Antonio Air Depot, Texas
17.2.42
Assigned Douglas Aircraft Co for mods
28.2.42
Assigned Mines AAF, Los Angeles California for shipping and packing
9.3.42
Assigned USAAF 5th Air Force, Australia
9.4.42
Received by Commonwealth Aircraft Corporation at Fishermans Bend Vic for assembly
26.4.42
Assembly completed at CAC
27.4.42
Delivered to USAAF in Australia.
Operated by USAAF 21 Troop Carier Squadron between Australia and New Guinea

Directorate of Air Transport Allied Air Forces issued radio callsign VHCCF which was painted over the camouflage on the aircraft
29.7.42
DAT daily movements list shows C-39 CCF (No.530) Archerfield-Townsville-Archerfield
1.5.43
Assigned 39 Troop Carrier Squadron. Named Gallahad
28.5.43
Assigned 317 Troop Carrier Squadron
16.12.43
Letter to DCA from Assistant Director, Directorate of Air Transport (DAT), "due to the loss of Qantas Empire Airways Lodestar CAB in the New Guinea accident, C-56 CAF is to be transferred from ANA to QEA and C-39 CCF is to be transferred from USAAC (sic) to ANA."
16.12.43
CCF delivered Townsville-Archerfield for handover to ANA
23.12.43
Australian CofA application: Australian National Airways Pty Ltd owned by US Army Air Forces.
To be operated by ANA under radio callsign VHCCF, no Australian civil registration will be issued.
Application quotes USAAF serial 38-530, c/n 2087, built Santa Monica 8.9.39, Wright G1820-65s.

1.1.44
Australian CofA No.X14 issued for VHCCG, in a DCA special series of X-prefix CofAs for military transport aircraft  operated on loan to Australian civil airines under wartime agreements
25.1.44
Pilot log: CCF forced landing Kempsey NSW due engine trouble. ANA Captain Stewart Hack, copilot Dick Bampton and RAAF Sgt. Bray. Engine changed, CCF ferried Kempsey-Brisbane 31.1.44
8.3.44
Pilot log: ANA Captain A. Fache: CCF 3 hrs 5 mins.
9.3.44
Pilot log: ANA Captain A. Fache: CCF 2 hrs 35 mins.
9.3.44
Crashed forced landing near Molesworth Vic due engine power loss. Major damage.
ANA Captain Leslie N. Dunn, RAAF F/O A. Turner, carrying a total of 15 US and Australian troops, no injuries.  Had departed Essendon at 10.46am for Mascot, encountered severe icing and lost engine power. Captain decided to make a forced landing but aircraft over ran clear area, both outer wings torn off by trees.
3.44
Wreck transported by road to Essendon Airport
20.4.44
Assistant Director Air Transport DAT wrote to DCA advising that wreck of CCF is held by ANA, who have been requested to retain and store CCF until a decision is made on its future use.
11.44
US Foreign Economic Administration correspondence with DCA regarding USAAF military aircraft that have been  declared surplus and are available for disposal to Australian airline companies on a cash basis.
A total of 12 aircraft are listed: C-39s, ex-Dutch Lodestars, DC-3s and a DC-5.

- includes Douglas C-39 38-530 total time approximately 4,500 hours. Status: non-repairable as result of crash, salvage for parts. Located Essendon Aerodrome, Melbourne with ANA.

Wreck purchased by Australian National Airways Pty Ltd, Essendon Aerodrome Vic
45
Due wartime shortage of civil aircraft ANA considering a rebuild of VHCCF
45
DCA reserved registrations VH-ARA to VH-ARD for 3 USAAF C-39s and a DC-5 purchased by ANA. VH-ARA was reserved for  VHCCF in the event it was rebuilt, but not taken up

Not rebuilt by ANA, stripped for parts at Essendon, sold for scrap.


C-39 VHCCF in 1943 with name "Gallahad" on nose.                                   Geoff Goodall collection


Forced landing near Molesworth Vic 9 March 1944 while operated by ANA on military courier duties.
Photo: John Hopton Collection


           Douglas C-39    38-532 "VHCCH" Down and Go,  to VH-ARC
8.39
Completed by Douglas Aircraft Co Inc at Santa Monica, California, c/n 2089

Built to USAAC order as a C-39-DO serial 38-532. Wright  R-1820-55 engines
17.8.39
Delivered to USAAC as 38-532. Delivered to San Bernadino Army Airfield, California
.39
Assigned 3rd Transport Squadron, Duncan AAF
2.2.42
Damaged on landing Duncan AAF, Texas
20.2.42
Assigned Douglas Aircraft Co 
25.2.42
Assigned Mines AAF, California 
9.3.42
Assigned 5th Air Force, Brisbane. Shipped to Australia.
9.4.42
Received at Commonwealth Aircraft Corp, Fishermans Bend, Melbourne for unpacking and assembly
26.4.42
Assembly by CAC completed
27.4.42
Delivered to USAAF. Operated by USAAF transport units between Australia and New Guinea

Directorate of Air Transport Allied Air Forces issued radio callsign VHCCH which was painted in white over the aircraft's camouflage. Name on nose Down and Go
1.5.43
Assigned 39 Troop Carrier Squadron, 317th Troop Carrier Group
2.5.43
Received by Commonwealth Aircraft Corporation at Fishermans Bend Vic for engine change and overhaul
4.6.43
Completed at CAC and delivered 

Loaned by USAAF to Australian National Airways Pty Ltd, Melbourne to be operated on military transport duties as instructed by Directorate of Air Transport. ANA to  maintain the aircraft and provide an ANA Captain for each military sortie, DAT to provide a RAAF or USAAF copilot.
5.6.43
Australian CofA application: Australian National Airways Pty Ltd owned by US Army Air Forces.
To be operated by ANA under radio callsign VHCCH, no Australian civil registration will be issued.
Application quotes USAAF serial 38-532 c/n 2089
5.6.43
CofA No.X8 issued for VHCCH, in a DCA special series of X-prefix CofAs for military transport aircraft  operated on loan to Australian civil airines under wartime agreements
5.6.43
Commenced operation by ANA
7.6.43
Forced landing Mascot due engine oil pressure. Cpt. Vern Cerche, F/O Dunn
23.6.43
CCH delayed Parafield due engine trouble.
17.3.44
CofA renewed at ANA Essendon
30.3.44
Port tailplane struck by US vehicle while unloading passengers and freight at DAT hangar at Archerfield. Repaired overnight, departed on normal DAT schedule next morning
20.4.44
Assistant Director Air Transport wrote to ANA advising that CCH would be replaced by a C-49 and that ANA is requested to retain and store CCH until a decision is made on its future use.   
4.5.44
Returned to USAAF by ANA
11.44
US Foreign Economic Administration correspondence with DCA regarding military aircraft that have been  declared surplus and are available for disposal to Australian airline operating companies on a cash basis.
A total of 12 aircraft are listed: C-39s, ex-Dutch Lodestars, DC-3s and a DC-5.

- includes Douglas C-39 38-532 located Essendon, “fly-away condition after pre-flight inspection”
c1.45
Purchased ex US Foreign Liquidation Commission by Australian National Airways Pty Ltd, Melbourne
6.5.46
Civil Registration Application: Australian National Airways Pty Ltd, Essendon.
Applications for CCG, CCH and CXC submitted to DCA with the same letter from ANA which stated "Import of these aircraft was approved on 20 February 1946."
24.5.46
Added to Register as VH-ARC
29.5.46
Memo to DCA Head Office from DCA Airport Manager, Essendon:  C-39s CCG & CCH are parked with wings removed in the open behind an ANA hangar at Essendon. Wings are stored.
7.11.46
DCA approves ferry flights of CCG & CCH in those markings from Essendon to Mascot. Not carried out.
11.46
DCA internal memos discuss what action the Department would take should ANA wish to put their two stored C-39s VH-ARB and ARC into passenger service. DCA does not want DC-2 types in post-war airline use because of poor climb performance. Head Office decides to defer a decision.
7.11.47
DCA approve an ANA request to ferry C-39s VH-ARB and VH-ARC from Essendon to Sydney displaying their current markings VHCCG and VHCCH.
24.11.47
Australian CofA issued as VH-ARC
7.12.47
Change of ownership:   Colonel Charles Morrison McDonald, Sydney NSW, trading as Macair Charter Service
8.12.47
Letter to DCA McDonald on letterhead Macair Charter Service c/- Curtis Madsen Aircrafts, Bankstown: he intends to install 15 passenger seats in VH-ARC which is presently a freighter. "I have a contract to carry a few loads of migrants to Australia on a charter basis.".  Will then be used for freight work
1.48
Cabin interior being lined and seating installed, should be ready to depart overseas within two weeks.
Due to depart Australia on 6.2.48
12.2.48
Weighed on DCA scales at Bankstown for calculations to prepare new Load Charts for passenger seating
11.3.48
Engines damaged at Darwin, aircraft grounded. 
VH-ARC remained at Darwin for the next 4 months, by which time Macair had ceased operations
17.3.48
Sydney Morning Herald newspaper report on migrant charter flights from Europe :
“Macair Charter Service claimed its Douglas DC-2 had been sabotaged when starting to operate its first migration flight. The aircraft had made a forced landing at Darwin.”

Macair was formed with the original intention of developing the air freighting of valuable livestock between Australia and New Guinea as pioneered by Guinea Air Traders. But the Macair DC-2 VH-ADZ and C-39 VH-ARC were diverted to passenger carrying, mainly on European migrant charters. However few, if any, flights to Rome were completed and Macair had ceased operating by May 1948.
18.6.48
Change of ownership: Arthur Carvelles, Rapid Air Service International, Sydney NSW.
Arthur Carveles was a Sydney suburban pharmacist who also operated a travel agency, chartering seats on aircraft of Intercontinental Air Tours, Sydney and Macair to carry migrants from Europe to Australia. McDonald had been in debt to Carvelles, who took legal action to acquire Macair aircraft to protect his investment.
21.6.48
Change of ownership: Guinea Air Traders Ltd, Lae. 
W. W. Alderton, GAT Director advised DCA that GAT will shortly send two replacement Wright Whirlwind engines to Darwin to be installed in VH-ARC.
7.48
DCA wrote a bland letter to GAT advising that the Department intended to reduce the Maximum All-Up Weight (MAUW) for C-39 type aircraft, based on recent DC-2 performance flight testing.
12.7.48
Angry response to DCA from GAT Director W.W.Alderton: "Had we known that your Department proposed to reduce the effective payload by practically 50%, we would certainly not have purchased them." He emphasised that the two GAT C-39s are fitted with more powerful models of Wright Cyclones to the DC-2.
25.7.48
VH-ARC ferried Darwin-Sydney after engines replacement and maintenance
29.7.48
GAT Director Alderton wrote to DCA offering VH-ARC for performance testing at Bankstown. He expresses confidence that such testing will show that an increase (not reduction) in payload and MAUW can be achieved.  VH-ARC is currently having maintenance by Curtis-Madsen Aircrafts at Bankstown and will be available next week.
8.48
Engines of VH-ARC found to require more work. Engine parts have been sent to ANA.
GAT then swapped Cyclone G2s from VH-ARB to VH-ARC so that the DCA flight tests can proceed
19.8.48
Weighed on DCA scales at Bankstown in preparation for a series of flight performance tests.
GAT pilot for performance flight testing is Captain John Dalrymple, who previously flew C-39s for ANA
8.48
As a result of the flight performance tests in VH-ARC, DCA agreed to leave C-39 MAUW at the original 21,000lb
29.8.48
CofA renewed at Bankstown, fitted with 14 passenger seats and toilet
9.48
Based at Lae.

GAT pilot Tom Deegan remembered the two C-39s:
"ARC had been shot up with holes during the war. Hundreds of little holes in the fuselage, patched and rivetted. Those C-39s had small engines in them and they'd ice up if you flew in cloud. Carburettor would ice up. You'd be flying along with hot air underneath the carburettor and lose half your power.
I started off GAT's Lae-Goroka-Madang-Wewak-Manus Island-Kavieng-Rabaul return service in a C-39. The people were very grateful. It was a weekly service and they got mail instead of waiting for ships."
14.12.48
Sydney Airport Customs log: VH-ARC arrived Sydney from Lae, Captain J. Dalrymple GAT
16.3.49
Damaged in heavy landing at Kerowagi, New Guinea
8.51
DCA Sydney office memo: VH-ARC is at Bankstown in u/s condition.

Assumed had been shipped damaged from New Guinea for possible rebuild.  A DCA file report in 5.49 states VH-ARC was owned by Mandated Airlines with no mention of damage.
6.8.51
Struck-off Register, owner still GAT
10.51
Walter E. James, Managing Director of South Coast Airways, Wollongong wrote to DCA enquiring about operational requirements for the C-39 type. James states that he intends to purchase a C-39 from Mandated Airlines (sic) for his Sydney-Cowra airline service.
3.54
VH-ARC fuselage and wings reported at Bankstown


C-39 VHCCH at Essendon circa 1944 while operated by ANA, devoid of USAAF or ANA markings.
Civil Aviation Historical Society Alan Betteridge Collection

             Douglas C-39     38-535 "VHCCE"  Hot to Go
9.39
Completed by Douglas Aircraft Co Inc at Santa Monica, California, c/n 2092.

Built to USAAC order as a C-39-DO serial 38-535. Wright  R-1820-55 engines.
This was the final C-39 of the order for 35 aircraft.
28.9.39
Delivered to USAAC as 38-535

Assigned transport radio callsign VHCCE.  Named Hot to Go

Returned to USA
10.44
Stricken from USAAF charge.
USAAF record card indicates sold surplus to a commercial operator, but no subsequent civil career traced


6.  The 1984 Air Race 50th Anniversary DC-2 flight to Melbourne
            To celebrate the 50th anniversary of the successful KLM DC -2 air race entry and the remarkable night emergency landing at Albury, a commemorative flight along the air race race was organised.  The DC-2 used was N39165 (c/n 1404) owned by American vintage aircraft collector Colgate W. Darden of South Carolina, one of only two airworthy DC-2s remaining in the world. It was accurately painted as "PH-AJU Uiver" and took part in commorative events in The Netherlands before flying to Australia.
            N39165's arrival at RAAF Laverton near Melbourne to replicate the arrival of the original Uiver in 1934 attracted a large crowd. It was a major event for the Australian Dutch community. An array of local vintage aircraft flew in to add atmosphere to the occcasion.
            The date was 5 February 1984, a hot summer day with parched and dusty airfield grass - very different from the mud and rain of Uiver's famous night landing on the Albury racecourse.  The following pictures of N39165 were taken at Laverton by Geoff Goodall.

`







Endpiece:  A flying DC-2 at Oshkosh 1989
            Confirming you never know what you might see at the annual EAA fly-ins at Oshkosh,Wisconsin, the only other flying DC-2 taxied past the compiler after arriving unannounced at the July 1989 Oshkosh event.  NC1934D was then operated by the Donald Douglas Historical Foundation and had flown across the country from Long Beach, California carrying a load of passengers. It was originally built for Pan American Airways in March 1935.



References:
- Australian Civil Aircraft Register,  Department of Civil Aviation, Melbourne
- DCA aircraft files, National Archives of Australia, Melbourne and Perth
- RAAF records, RAAF Air Historical Section, Canberra
- The Douglas DC-3 and its predecessors, J.M.G.Gradidge, Air Britain, 1984
- McDonnell Douglas Aircraft since 1920, Rene J. Francillon, Putnam 1979
- Flypast: a record of aviation in Australia, Neville Parnell & Trevor Boughton, AGPS 1988
- US Military Aircraft Designations and Serials, J.M.Andrade, Midland Counties Publications, 1979
- War without Glory, John Balfe, Macmillan, 1984
- And Far From Home, Flying RAAF Transports in the Pacific War and after, John Balfe, Macmillan 1985
- Outback Airman, Harry Purvis with Joan Priest, Rigby, 1979
- There and Back, Alan Randall, self-published Melbourne 1983
- Air Crash Vols 1 & 2, Macarthur Job, Aerospace Publications, Canberra 1992
- Cootamundra Aerodrome, Ben Dannecker, privately published 1976
- Balus - The Aeroplane in Papua New Guinea, Volume 1, James Sinclair, Robert Brown & Associates (Australia) 1986
- Airlines and Aircraft of the Ansett Group 1921-2002, Fred Niven, Edition 12
- DC-2 Down In The Sea, Robert Kendall Piper, Wings magazine, NZ, Autumn 1985
- The Douglas DC-2, James Kightly, Flypast magazine, Melbourne, November 2006
- DC-2 In Australian Service, Eric Allen, Australian Aviation magazine, March 1983
- Douglas DC-2 At War, Arthur Pearcy, Aviation News magazine, 24 January 1985
- Significant Dutch Flights in Dutch-Australian aviation history, draft, Noel Jackling
- Noel Wilson Webster GM, interview and details of A30-8 ditching, Lex McAulkay, Maryborough Qld
- Australian Douglas transport listings compiled by John Hopton, Alan Bovelt, Bob Livingstone


Back to the Australian Aviation Menu